×

Having her for 72 years just isn’t enough, we need even more. Meryl Streep has been a staple of the film industry, often described as our greatest living actress, and shows no signs of slowing down.

With three Oscars (supporting actress for “Kramer vs. Kramer” and lead actress for “Sophie’s Choice” and “The Iron Lady”), three Emmys (lead actress limited for “Holocaust” and “Angels in America” and outstanding narrator for “Five Came Back”), six Grammy noms and just a single Tony mention in her career, Streep has had plenty of awards recognition. But, in celebration of her birthday, Variety is counting down Streep’s 10 greatest film performances that weren’t singled out by Oscar.

As we venture through the history of Madame Streep’s impressive work, connecting the term “snub” to the most decorated actress of all-time is a strange predicament. A magnet for awards since she’s started, her first feature acting credit was in Fred Zinnemann’s “Julia” (1977), which picked up 11 Oscar nominations including best picture, winning three for for supporting actor (Jason Robards), supporting actress (Vanessa Redgrave) and adapted screenplay (Alvin Sargent).

Looking through her awards history, there have been a few performances that have been nominated by BAFTA, Golden Globes, and other bodies that haven’t resulted in Academy recognition. Turns in films like “She-Devil” (1989), “The River Wild” (1993), “Marvin’s Room” (1996) and “The Hours” (2002) have all come up short on Oscar nomination morning, despite critical acclaim. Even performances that didn’t find any awards traction — like “Still of the Night” (1982) opposite Roy Scheider and “Falling in Love” alongside Robert DeNiro — have their fans, though they may not be as widely seen as others.

While not an EGOT as of yet (maybe one day soon?), Streep is undoubtedly one of the best in the business. Check out the list of non-Oscar nominated best performances down below.

Honorable mentions: “Mamma Mia!”(2008), “Marvin’s Room” (1996), “Ricki and the Flash” (2015), “She-Devil” (1989)