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Antoni Porowski, the resident foodie on Netflix’s hit show “Queer Eye,” is taking his culinary talents to another reality series for the streamer.

In his first big swing outside of “Queer Eye,” Porowski will host and executive produce Netflix’s newest cooking competition series, “Easy-Bake Battle.” It already completed filming and will be released in the fall. (Worry not, reality TV fans. “Queer Eye” isn’t going anywhere.)

Inspired by the popular children’s toy, “Easy-Bake Battle” spotlights home chefs who go head-to-head in two rounds of savory and sweet challenges using only an Easy-Bake-style oven. Adult cooks — unlike the miniature kitchen appliance, this competition series is not suited for children — will compete for $25,000 in each battle. The winner has the chance to win up to $100,000.

Here’s the official synopsis: “Life is complicated, but cooking doesn’t have to be! Enter Easy-Bake Battle, a new culinary competition series inspired by Hasbro’s iconic Easy-Bake Oven, featuring skilled and ultra clever home cooks, all with a ton of heart and soul, facing off and using their most ingenious kitchen hacks to prove who can make the easiest, fastest, and most delicious food.”

Porowski — who will be joined by guest judges, including Kristen Kish of “Iron Chef” and “Nailed It!” alum Jacques Torres — helped pitch and develop the series. “We got to know Antoni on ‘Queer Eye,’ and we always knew there was more to do with him,” Netflix VP of nonfiction content Jenn Levy told Variety. “He makes food super accessible.”

Hasbro’s eOne is producing the series. Daniel Calin will serve as showrunner and executive producer on “Easy-Bake Battle,” which consists of eight 30-minute episodes. Along with Porowski, the show’s executive producers are Tara Long and Geno McDermott for eOne and Wes Kauble.

From travel documentaries like “Somebody Feed Phil” and “Chef’s Table” to game-style shows like “Nailed It,” “Is It Cake?” and “The Big Family Cooking Showdown,” Netflix has invested heavily in food-centric series.

“Our food shows are co-viewed by families,” Levy says. “The best are the ones where parents are getting as much out of the show as younger kids. We try to find a central question or focus to make [shows] stand out.”