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Jason Bateman, Tony Hale, Aisha Tyler and More Remember Jessica Walter: ‘A Queen in Every Way’

Jessica Walter dead
Photo by Katy Winn/Invision/AP

After news broke on Thursday that the legendary Jessica Walter had died, celebrities took to social media to share condolences and fond memories of the award-winning actress.

Walter, who was 80, was best known for her portrayal of Lucille Bluth in “Arrested Development.” Her career spanned more than six decades and included other iconic roles, such as Malory Archer in “Archer” and the title character in the 1970s crime drama “Amy Prentiss.”

In addition to film and TV, Walter also found success in theater, starring in Broadway productions like “Advise & Consent,” Neil Simon’s “Rumors,” “A Severed Head,” “Nightlife” and “Photo Finish,” which earned her the Clarence Derwent Award for Most Promising Newcomer.

Jason Bateman, who starred as Michael Bluth on “Arrested Development,” paid tribute to his on-screen mom.

“R.I.P. Jessica Walter. What an incredible career, filled with amazing performances,” he tweeted. “I will forever remember my time with her, watching her bring Lucille Bluth to life. She was one of a kind. All my love and thoughts to her family.”

“She was a force, and her talent and timing were unmatched,” Tony Hale said. “Rest In Peace Mama Bluth.”

Hale played Walter’s son, Buster Bluth, on “Arrested Development.”

David Cross, who also starred in “Arrested Development” alongside Walter, tweeted, “I consider myself privileged and very lucky to have been able to work with her.”

Will Arnett honored Walter on Twitter, saying he is “fortunate to have had a front row seat to her brilliance for 25 years” and offering thoughts for Walter’s daughter, Brooke, and grandson, Micah. Arnett played one of Walter’s sons, Gob Bluth, on “Arrested Development.”

Alia Shawkat, who played Walter’s granddaughter Maeby Fünke in “Arrested Development,” posted a tribute on Instagram, writing, “love you Gangie.”

“Jessica Walter never missed,” wrote John Levenstein, who produced and wrote for “Arrested Development.” “If she didn’t get a laugh there was a problem with the script.”

“Archer” star Aisha Tyler called Walter “a queen in every way: kind, classy, incredibly talented, generous with love & support.”

Viola Davis honored Walter on Twitter, writing, “I grew up watching you AND admiring you.”

Dylan Gelula, who worked with Walter on “Jennifer Falls,” also took to Twitter to share a memory of the late actress. Attaching a photo from the show, Gelula called Walter “one of the sharpest funniest hardest working actors” she will ever know.

Adam Reed, creator and executive producer of “Archer,” said in a statement, “The ‘Archer’ family is heartbroken to lose Jessica Walter, our beloved colleague and friend. Jessica was a consummate professional, an actor’s actor, and the exact opposite of Malory Archer — warm, caring, and kind, with an absolutely cracking sense of humor — and it was both a privilege and a true honor to work with her over these many years. She will be greatly missed, but never forgotten.”

FX, the network behind “Archer,” released a statement that reads, “We are utterly heartbroken to learn of the passing of Jessica Walter. She was a comedic genius and a brilliant actor who personified wit, grace and elegance. Jessica’s ‘Malory Archer’ served as the bedrock character for the series and we were always honored to have her as member of our FX family. Words cannot describe the monumental loss we and theArcher’ producers and cast feel. We extend our love, appreciation and condolences to Jessica’s family.”

Gabrielle Carteris, president of SAG-AFTRA, wrote in a statement, “Our hearts are saddened by the passing of Jessica Walter. She was a gifted actor and unionist. Not only did Jessica win an Emmy but was nominated for multiple SAG Awards and served her fellow members as a Screen Actors Guild National Vice President for nearly a decade. On behalf of all members, I express our gratitude for her service and offer my condolences to her family and friends.”

Walter joined SAG-AFTRA in 1960 and served as a national VP for the union from 1975 to 1983.

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