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UPDATED: Atlanta rapper Lil Marlo has died, the Fulton County Medical Examiner’s office confirmed to NBC News. While no cause of death had been confirmed, TMZ, which first reported the news, cites a police source as saying the MC, whose real name was Rudolph Johnson, was shot while driving. The medical examiner’s office said he was 30, although some reports say he was 27.

A rep for his label, Quality Control, confirmed the death.

Atlanta police confirmed to NBC that officers found a 30-year-old man dead of gunshot wounds in a vehicle on I-285 near the Benjamin E. Mays Drive overpass after responding to a call about an accident on Saturday night, although they did not confirm his identity.

“At this time, investigators believe the victim was the intended target of the gunfire and they are working to determine the circumstances surrounding the shooting,” a police statement reads.

Lil Yachty posted about the shooting early Sunday, writing on Instagram, “We just did a song a 4 this morning smh rip brother.”

“So much potential that the world didn’t get a chance to see. Love you Bro. It’s really hard for me to say RIP💔,” wrote Quality Control cofounder Pierre “P” Thomas, who had taken Marlo under his wing.

Marlo signed with Quality Control — home to Yachty, Migos, Lil Baby, City Girls and others — in 2017 and released an album with Lil Baby, “2 the Hard Way,” later that year, as well as his own debut, “The Wire.” He released a pair of mixtapes, “The Real 1” and “9th Ward God,” in 2018, and dropped his most recent album, “1st & 3rd,” in February. He also released several singles and appeared on the first two “Quality Control: Control the Streets” compilations.

Marlo is survived by his mother, Santresa Maxey; his cousin, Denise Hill-Love, who helped raise him; and his two sons, R.J. and Marlo Jr.

Lil Yachty said in an Instagram post announcing Marlo’s death that the two rappers had been recording on Friday night. “We just did a song [at] 4 this morning smh rip brother,” he wrote.

Marlo was raised in Atlanta’s rough Bowen Homes housing projects and, like several Quality Control artists, turned to rapping as a way to escape his crime-plagued surroundings and upbringing. Jacoby Hudson, a longtime friend and Atlanta defense lawyer, told the New York Times that Marlo had just left a Bankhead block party late Saturday when he was killed.

“It’s heartbreaking, because I told Rudy it would end like this if he didn’t change the people he was around,” he said. “He didn’t let the music save him. He still wanted to be in the neighborhood. He cared about people and he took care of people. He loved too many people, and his loyalty is probably what got him killed.”

Marlo is survived by his mother, Santresa Maxey; his cousin, Denise Hill-Love, who helped raise him; and his two sons, R.J. and Marlo Jr.