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Garth Brooks recently encouraged his fans to socially distance by putting on a show that could only be seen on drive-in screens around the country. Now, he’s doing a lot more distancing himself by going into quarantine with his wife, Trisha Yearwood, after learning that their “camp” had been exposed to the coronavirus.

The announcement asserted that both Brooks are Yearwood are “fine” but will be quarantining for two weeks out of caution. The retreat to sheltering-at-home status means that a Facebook Live show the couple had scheduled for Tuesday is being postponed indefinitely, and Brooks’ weekly web show “Inside Studio G” is also put off.

“Out of an abundance of caution,” said the announcement, “Garth Brooks is moving his and Trisha Yearwood’s July 7th Facebook concert to a later date and postponing Inside Studio G for 2 weeks. While Garth and Trisha are fine, the Garth/Trisha camp has possibly been exposed to the Covid-19 virus. To be smart about this, they are all quarantining for 2 weeks and thank everyone for their concern. — Team Garth & TeamTY”

The announcement was put up on both singers’ Instagram, Twitter and Facebook pages.

Brooks’ drive-in performance, which featured him and his full touring band playing on a soundstage in front of a wall of LED lights, was exhibited in open-air theaters June 27 but was pre-recorded. Brooks and his representatives did not reveal when the performance was taped, although he did appear in live social media appearances to supplement the nationwide screenings that night. The concert film did sellout business at $100 a carload in many of the more than 300 drive-ins where it was shown around the country, although no box office totals were announced.

An earlier online joint concert by Brooks and Yearwood on March 23 was reported to have drawn 5.2 million viewers and momentarily crashed the Facebook Live site as it went out live. The popularity of that particular webcast led to CBS signing the couple up for an April 1 special, “Garth & Trisha Live!” Brooks and Yearwood subsequently took over a Grand Ole Opry telecast, radio broadcast and webstream that Opry reps claimed was seen or heard by more than 5 million fans.