×

Nowhere has the COVID pandemic been as paradoxically good for the real estate market, perhaps, as California’s patrician seaside community of Montecito, where TV writer-producer Oliver Goldstick has sold two neighboring properties in an off-market deal for a combined $4.1 million and concurrently shelled out a bit more than $4.9 million for a stately and nearby 1920s English Tudor residence designed by beloved high-society architect George Washington Smith.

Originally the carriage house to a neighboring estate built by sisters Clara and Mary Cudahy, unmarried heiresses to a Midwestern meatpacking plant fortune, the not-quite 3,800-square-foot home has three bedrooms and four-and-a-half bathrooms. A detached two-car garage and a one-bed/one-bath guest cottage complete the residential ensemble, according to listings held by Maureen McDermut at Sotheby’s Intl. Realty. Goldstick was repped in the deal by The Ebbin Group at Compass.

Glossy wood floors and original architectural details such as doorways emblazoned with fluted pilasters and split pediments highlight the foyer that leads to formal living and dining rooms, the former with a fireplace set into a wall of bookshelves. The spacious and relaxed kitchen is up to date with slab-marble counters, and a separate den spills out to the backyard. The principal bedroom is on the ground floor while two more bedrooms upstairs each have an en-suite bath.

French doors open the back of the house to a brick terrace under a vine-laden pergola alongside a swimming pool and spa. The one-acre estate also includes velvety tree-shaded lawns and a sun-dappled gravel patio and stone fire pit surrounded by lush ferns. Herbs and veggies can be home grown in a kitchen garden, while a small orchard is planted with a variety of fruit trees.

Goldstick, whose primetime credits include the ABC cult favorite “Pretty Little Liars” as well as “Lipstick Jungle” and “Ugly Betty,” has long owned a home in L.A.’s Los Feliz area — a 1920s era pan-Mediterranean villa that tax records indicate was picked up in the mid-1990s for $600,000.