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London’s The Old Vic theater has pulled the Daniel Radcliffe and Alan Cumming-fronted “Endgame” two weeks ahead of its scheduled end as the coronavirus outbreak slowly begins to impact the West End.

In a statement released Sunday evening, the 202-year-old institution said, “Whilst we have no reason to disagree with current scientific and government advice on coping with the coronavirus, given the new travel and other restrictions in place, it is nevertheless becoming increasingly impractical to sustain business as usual at our theater.”

“It is with great sadness that we have had to decide to suspend the presentation of ‘Endgame’ in a double bill with ‘Rough for Theatre II’ for the next two weeks, which is the remainder of its run.”

The Samuel Beckett adaptation launched on Jan. 27 as a double bill with “Rough for Theatre II.” Interestingly, The Old Vic says there is “currently no change to the schedule” around the Timothée Chalamet-fronted play “4000 Miles,” which is slated to debut April 6.

London’s West End theater operators, including Delfont Mackintosh and Ambassador Theater Group, which run most of the major theaters, kept their venues running over the weekend, despite a number of no-shows and cancellations. They instead took added precautions, such as deep cleans ahead of shows and limited contact with cast at stage doors.

The not-for-profit Old Vic noted that without Arts Council support, it is “completely dependent” on philanthropic donations, sponsorship and ticket sales. A full refund of all lost performances “would be financially devastating for us,” it said.

“We are asking all ticket holders for the canceled performances to please consider donating the cost of the ticket rather than requesting a credit note or refund.”

Donors will receive a link to an exclusive video recording of the entire production of “Endgame” — a rare move permitted by the Beckett estate, the acting company and creatives — as well as a video message from the cast and a ‘friends’-tier membership to the venue.

While The Old Vic is the first major theater house to suspend productions, Sunday also marked the turning point for a number of smaller outfits in London.

North London’s Arcola Theater informed patrons Sunday evening that it has suspended all public performances until further notice, noting, “We do not believe that it is practical or responsible for us to stage shows while people’s lives are at risk. We will be contacting affected ticket-holders shortly.”

The business, which is a registered charity, added in an email that it is “determined to survive, to retain our dedicated team, and to get our shows back on track as soon as possible,” and has requested donations.

Elsewhere, Southwark’s Bunker Theater also postponed its ‘Morgan and Abi’s Power Share’ week of shows from artists in residence Morgan Lloyd Malcolm and Abi Zakarian, who were curating workshops, play readings and short pieces with a roster of directors.

Battersea theater The Turbine has also canceled performances from March 16 until April 18.

The U.K. was included in U.S. President Donald Trump’s coronavirus-related European travel ban on Saturday, after initially being excluded, along with Ireland.

The U.K. government — which has been criticized for a lack of clarity around its plans to fight the Covid-19 outbreak — has not yet instituted a public gatherings ban, but is expected to do so this coming week.

Currently, 35 people have died from coronavirus in the U.K.