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The BBC and BBC America will serve up a third installment of their popular “Planet Earth” series in 2022.

BBC America has set a five-year extension with BBC Studios for high-end natural history programming and will take rights to the ambitious “Planet Earth III” production as well as “Frozen Planet II” in 2021 and the David Attenborough-narrated “One Planet: Seven Worlds” in 2020. The series will go out on the BBC in the U.K.

“The BBC is world famous for its natural history programming and these new series will raise the bar even higher,” said Charlotte Moore, director of content at the British pubcaster. “The BBC is world famous for its natural history programming and these new series will raise the bar even higher.”

“One of the things we’re most proud of at BBC America is that we’ve established the network as the U.S. destination for the very best nature programming on the planet, from the BBC’s award-winning natural history unit,” said Sarah Barnett, president of entertainment networks for AMC Networks. “To bring together audiences for this kind of transcendent event television is a true privilege, we couldn’t be happier to continue to do this for the next five years.”

“Planet Earth III” is planned as eight one-hour episodes. The production is billed as the “most ambitious natural history landmark ever undertaken by the BBC” as it chronicles the lives of animals in various parts of the world. “Frozen Planet” is a six-part series that is a followup to BBC’s 2011 original production.

“One Planet: Seven Worlds” is a seven part series with each episode devoted to a single continent.

BBC America has staked out its turf in the high-end nature documentary arena. The cabler has been effective in turning the “Planet Earth” and “Blue Planet” series into programming events promoted across the AMC Networks cable group. The premiere episode of “Blue Planet II” last January was simulcast across all five AMC Networks.