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HBO has given out a series order to the untitled one-hour drama about the Los Angeles Lakers in the 1980s.

The project had originally been ordered to pilot at the premium cabler back in April. The show is described as chronicling the professional and personal lives of the 1980s Los Angeles Lakers, one of sports’ most revered and dominant dynasties.

The show stars: John C. Reilly as Jerry Buss, Jason Clarke as Jerry West, Quincy Isaiah as Magic Johnson, Solomon Hughes as Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Gaby Hoffmann as Claire Rothman, Hadley Robinson as Jeanie Buss, DeVaughn Nixon as Norm Nixon, Molly Gordon as Linda Zafrani, Rob Morgan as Earvin Johnson Sr., Spencer Garrett as Chick Hearn, Kirk Bovill as Donald Sterling, Delante Desouza as Michael Cooper, Stephen Adly Guirgis as Frank Mariani, Tamera Tomakili as Earletha ‘Cookie’ Kelly, and Joey Brooks as Lon Rosen.

The show is based on Jeff Pearlman’s non-fiction book “Showtime: Magic, Kareem, Riley, and the Los Angeles Lakers Dynasty of the 1980s.” Max Borenstein serves as writer and executive producer. Adam McKay directed the pilot and executive produces through his newly-christened production company Hyperobject Industries. Kevin Messick of Hyperobject will also executive produce along with Jason Shuman. Jim Hecht co-wrote the story and will also executive produce. Scott Stephens will also executive produce with Rodney Barnes co-executive producing.

McKay and Hyperobject recently inked a first-look deal at HBO. The first new project set up under that deal is a limited series about Jeffrey Epstein that is currently in development.

“Alongside Adam McKay and Max Borenstein, HBO couldn’t be more thrilled to examine one of professional sports’ most beloved empires,” said Francesca Orsi, executive vice president of HBO Programming. “Across 1980s Los Angeles, we’ll experience the exhilarating ride of a team that dominated a decade of basketball, and watch them not only achieve iconic status but transform the sport in every way.”

On the pilot side, HBO recently announced that a “Game of Thrones” prequel starring Naomi Watts hailing from writer Jane Goldman was not moving forward. At the same time, HBO gave out a series order for a different “Thrones” prequel titled “House of the Dragon.”