×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

‘Good Boys’ Stars Share What Seth Rogen Taught Them About Comedy

Twelve years after coming-of-age comedy “Superbad” shot Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg to superstardom, the creative duo introduced the new generation of comedic talent with the debut of “Good Boys” at the Regency Village Theatre in Westwood, Calif., on Wednesday night.

“Working with people who aren’t jaded yet by years in Hollywood is always a good time,” Goldberg told Variety.

“It’s nice to think we might be the ones who jade them,” Rogen chimed in, before producer James Weaver added, “We’re not going to have to deal with the jading, unless there’s a sequel, which I hope happens.”

Rogen and Goldberg produced the film, which follows three innocent tweens (Jacob Tremblay, Keith L. Williams and Brady Noon) as they go on an adventure to escape punishment and make a name for themselves among the popular crowd in the sixth grade — while armed with their parents’ sex toys. The friends, who call themselves “The Bean Bag Boys,” navigate the film as naively as any youngster could — with tons of cursing and ignorance toward the affairs of the opposite sex.

Though raunchy, the adults behind the R-rated film considered the innocence of their young stars when deciding just how far they could push the boundaries.

Popular on Variety

Every scene, we would look at and ask, ‘Oh, is this making us laugh?’ because we didn’t want to have swearing for swearing’s sake. They’re kids,” writer and producer Lee Eisenberg explained to Variety. “Even as we edited the movie…we had some of that where it just felt kind of unnecessary. It didn’t feel like that was the best version of it. We really wanted the kids to feel really sweet and innocent while we were throwing them into these adult situations.” 

And the movie reflects the time that we’re in,” Goldberg added. “And in this time, don’t call girls skanks. It’s not cool. It never was, it turns out.”

Tremblay (who stars as Max), Williams and Noon absolutely proved themselves to be just as sweet as their “Good Boys” characters while strolling down the red carpet, beaming with excitement. “This is one of those movies where I love to go and see the audiences’ reactions to all the jokes. They’ll be laughing so so hard and that just brings me such joy,” 12-year-old Tremblay told Variety.  

Noon (Thor) credited Rogen with helping the trio take their acting to the next level and bring the laughs, teaching them a thing or two about improvisation.

Seth is such a top-tier actor. Everyone knows who Seth Rogen is,” he said. “I feel like [improv] is a very important skill in different genres, not just comedy; drama, romance, everything, action.” Williams (who plays Lucas) added, “I love improving now. I would say 90% of the movie is improv.”

On being named as a mentor for the kids, Rogen responded, “Woah. That’s truly a horrifying thing to hear. I specifically did not try to teach them anything but I would say that’s very nice, very flattering, and maybe a failure on their parents’ part.”

Before heading into the theater, Rogen made a quick statement regarding Universal’s recent cancellation of “The Hunt” release amid controversy surrounding the film, including a critical tweet from President Donald Trump. Rogen can relate; in December 2014, Sony effectively canceled the theatrical release of his film “The Interview” following threats from hackers linked to North Korea (the film went on to be released digitally).

“It sucks when an evil world leader gets your movie canceled,” the actor said.

“Good Boys” is in theaters on Aug. 16.

More Film

  • Robert De Niro, Martin Scorsese and

    Film News Roundup: Leonardo DiCaprio Presenting Robert De Niro SAG Life Achievement Award

    In today’s film news roundup, Leonardo DiCaprio will present Robert De Niro with his SAG Life Achievement Award, the Oliver Sacks documentary finds a home and UCLA’s School of Theater, Film and Television gets a new dean. AWARD PRESENTATION Leonardo DiCaprio has been selected to present Robert De Niro the SAG Life Achievement Award  at [...]

  • KARNAWAL

    ‘Karnawal,’ ‘Restless,’ ‘Summer White,’ ‘Firsts’ Win Big at Ventana Sur

    BUENOS AIRES  — With Ventana Sur now firing on multiple cylinders, featuring pix-in post or project competitions for not only art films but also genre pics and animation – two sectors embraced by young creators in Latin America – “Karnawal,” “Restless,” “Summer White” and  “Firsts” proved big winners among Ventana Sur’s arthouse and animation competitions, [...]

  • (center) George MacKay as Schofield in

    From "1917" to "Jojo Rabbit," Composers of Some of the Year's Top Scores Talk Shop

    “1917,” Thomas Newman The 20-year collaboration of director Sam Mendes and composer Thomas Newman has encompassed midlife crisis (“American Beauty”), crime in the Depression (“Road to Perdition”), the Gulf War (“Jarhead”), marriage in the 1950s (“Revolutionary Road”) and two James Bond adventures (“Skyfall,” “Spectre”). Now they’ve tackled World War I, with “1917,” but Mendes’ much-talked-about [...]

  • Billy Magnussen Aladdin

    'Aladdin' Spinoff With Billy Magnussen's Character in the Works for Disney Plus

    Disney is developing a spinoff of its live-action “Aladdin” with Billy Magnussen reprising his Prince Anders character. The unnamed project is in early development for the studio’s recently launched Disney Plus streaming service. Disney has hired Jordan Dunn and Michael Kvamme to write a script centered on the haughty Prince Anders, one of Princess Jasmine’s [...]

  • ROAD TRIP – In Disney and

    Disney Boasts a Bevy of Hopefuls for Oscar's Original Song Race

    When the Academy announces its shortlist for song nominations on Dec. 16, you can be certain that at least one Disney song will be on it and probably more. Disney songs have been nominated 33 times in the past 30 years, winning 12 of the gold statuettes. This year, the studio has at least four [...]

  • Innovative Scores Elevated the Year's Documentaries

    Innovative Scores Elevated the Year's Documentaries

    It’s next to impossible for a documentary score to be Oscar-nominated alongside the dozens of fictional narratives entered each year. But it did happen, just once: In 1975, composer Gerald Fried was nominated for his music for “Birds Do It, Bees Do It,” a documentary on the mating habits of animals. Fried, now 91, perhaps [...]

  • Ron Leibman, Jessica Walter'Mary Stuart' Play

    Ron Leibman, Tony-Winning Actor Known for 'Angels in America' and 'Friends,' Dies at 82

    Ron Leibman, an Emmy-winning actor who garnered a Tony for his work in Broadway’s “Angels in America” and played the father of Jennifer Aniston’s Rachel Green on “Friends,” died on Friday. He was 82. Robert Attermann, CEO of Abrams Artists Agency, confirmed the news to Variety. No further details were immediately available. Leibman, a native [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content