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Ryan Adams’ Guitarist Begs Him to ‘Get Help’

In the wake of a Feb. 13 New York Times report in which multiple women accuse Ryan Adams of sexual misconduct or emotionally abusive behavior, Adams’ guitarist, Todd Wisenbaker, urged the singer to “get help” in an Instagram post on Sunday.

Beginning by writing in the caption, “This is incredibly hard for me to do but Ryan please get help,” Wisenbaker implied that he knew Adams’ behavior was improper. “There were times when I chose to believe his insane version of the truth because it was easier than believing that anyone is capable of being this much of a monster,” he wrote. “It’s sickening and embarrassing. I’ve recently learned that pretty much everything he’s ever told me is a lie upon a lie upon a lie.”

Among the accusers were Adams’ ex-wife Mandy Moore — who spoke about the marriage in a podcast that aired Sunday — singer-songwriter Phoebe Bridges, and a woman known only as “Ava” with whom Adams exchanged sexually oriented texts and Skype sessions while she was underage (the FBI is reportedly investigating that claim).

He did say, however, that he offered help to Adams. “Some time ago I told him to get help and he asked me to help him,” Wisenbaker writes. “I don’t regret and will never regret trying to help someone in real need… But my life has become a complete sh–storm of someone else’s utter delusion.”

He concludes by saying that despite his reluctance to speak out from concern for his family’s safety, “I do realize that I have a responsibility to speak up. The women that spoke out are brave beyond words.”

The most serious accusation against Adams listed in the article are the sexually explicit texts and Skype sessions that he allegedly exchanged with “Ava.” Two attorneys told Variety that Adams could be in serious legal trouble over the exchanges with the woman, now 20, who says she never met him in person. On Thursday, the Times reported that an unnamed law enforcement official said the FBI is “looking into” whether Adams’ behavior was criminal. The fan was between the ages of 14 and 16 when the interactions, which included nudity, took place. Through his lawyer, Andrew B. Brettler, Adams denied that he “ever engaged in inappropriate online sexual communications with someone he knew was underage.”

In the wake of the article, three music-equipment companies ended their sponsorship deal with Adams, and his upcoming release through Capitol Records was canceled, a source confirmed to Variety.

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