×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Broadway Review: ‘Choir Boy’

Praise the Lord! The boys in the choir are back -- this time on Broadway.

With:
Nicholas L. Ashe, Daniel Bellomy, Jonathan Burke, Gerald Caesar, John Clay III, Chuck Cooper, Caleb Eberhardt, Marcus Gladney, J. Quinton Johnson, Austin Pendleton, Jeremy Pope.

1 hour, 45 minutes

Honestly, I was afraid that “Choir Boy” — the sweetly exuberant account of a gifted prep school boy’s coming of age, written by “Moonlight” Oscar winner Tarell Alvin McCraney — would be swallowed up in a Broadway house, after winning us over in an Off Broadway staging in 2013.  But aside from the odd set piece (a back wall of big bricks painted red and meaning … what?), the play transfers nicely, under the surefooted direction of Trip Cullman, from Manhattan Theatre Club’s smaller studio space. The new venue also gives the show’s sensational young lead, Jeremy Pope, more room to spread his wings and soar.

Pope plays Pharus Young, a Junior at the Charles R. Drew Prep School for Boys who’s refreshingly candid about being gay — so candid that Headmaster Marrow (Chuck Cooper, a rock-solid presence) is concerned that he might provoke the school bullies.  “You gotta tighten up,” he advises Pharus.  “Like all men hold something in.”

But having been entrusted to sing the school song at the Seniors’ graduation, Pharus is too proud and honor-bound to snitch on the headmaster’s big-bully nephew Bobby Marrow (a sturdy J. Quinton Johnson) for cruelly hassling him about his “sissy” mannerisms.  Praising the Lord and leading the Charles Drew Prep Choir are all that the deeply religious Pharus really cares about, so he can put up with whatever torture Bobby can dish out.

But when the bullying does get too much for Pharus, he’s always got a big, strong, loyal friend in his jock roommate, Anthony, played with quiet strength by John Clay III.

McCraney has an ear for schoolboy vernacular and the confidential bedtime talks between Pharus and Anthony are innocently funny and downright sweet. “Sick of people calling me something I ain’t doing,” Pharus complains to Anthony about the sexual innuendos. “I’m just Pharus.” To which complaint Anthony simply and kindly responds, “Ain’t nothing wrong with being Pharus.” He’s quite right. Pharus is a strange and wonderful character with the courage to be his own exceptional self.

Nevertheless, tensions become so fraught that the headmaster asks Mr. Pendleton (Austin Pendleton, basking in a role that suits all his endearing quirks), who has come out of retirement to teach a course in “creative thinking,” to serve as the choir’s faculty advisor.

Mr. Pendleton doesn’t have much luck curbing the animal spirits that make prep school a harrowing experience for sensitive students like Pharus. But in a pivotal scene that’s much too short, the old professor (who can’t even sing) elicits a lively debate on the history of Negro spirituals. And it’s through his encouragement that the boys learn to express their deepest feelings through song — proving Pharus’s point that spirituals can’t be confined to history because this music has never lost its power to comfort and heal.

The music is as joyous to the audience as it is for Pharus. In music director Jason Michael Webb’s fresh arrangements, the songs follow an arc from familiar hymns sung in strict choral harmony to less formal, but meaningful solos. Everyone gets his moment on the musical high wire. Bad-boy Bobby and his baby-boy sidekick, Junior (the angelic Nicholas L. Ashe), get goofy playing at being Boys II Men. A pious divinity student earnestly played by Caleb Eberhardt has a shattering moment with the old Skip Scarborough song “I Have Never Been So Much in Love Before.” But honestly, when all is said and sung, you’ve never heard a more plaintive sound than the voices of a roomful of homesick boys singing themselves to sleep with “Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child.”

Broadway Review: 'Choir Boy'

Samuel J. Friedman Theater; 637 Seats; $149 top. Opened Jan. 8, 2019. Reviewed Jan. 3. Running time: ONE HOUR, 45 MIN.

Production: A Manhattan Theater Club production of a play in one act by Tarell Alvin McCraney.

Creative: Directed by Trip Cullman. Sets & costumes, David Zinn; lighting, Peter Kaczorowski; original music & sound, Fitz Patton; music direction, arrangements & original music, Jason Michael Webb; fight director, Thomas Schall; movement, Camille A. Brown; production stage manager, Narda E. Alcorn.

Cast: Nicholas L. Ashe, Daniel Bellomy, Jonathan Burke, Gerald Caesar, John Clay III, Chuck Cooper, Caleb Eberhardt, Marcus Gladney, J. Quinton Johnson, Austin Pendleton, Jeremy Pope.

More Legit

  • Bryan Cranston on the Exhausting Joys

    Listen: Bryan Cranston on the Exhausting Joys of Broadway

    For anyone who doubts that being a Broadway actor can be grueling, let Bryan Cranston set you straight. Listen to this week’s podcast below: “There is a cumulative effect of fatigue that happens on the Broadway schedule that no amount of sleep the night before is going to wash away,” the Emmy and Tony-winning actor [...]

  • Jeff Daniels Variety Broadway to Kill

    How 'To Kill a Mockingbird' Beat the Odds to Deliver a Broadway Smash

    Jeff Daniels slumps into a chair in the Shubert Theatre, grasping an oversize Starbucks and looking bone-crushingly exhausted. His eyelids are heavy, and he seems like a man in desperate need of rest. It’s easy to understand why. It’s late March, and Daniels has just given his 100th Broadway performance as Atticus Finch, the small-town attorney [...]

  • ZZ Top, Caesars Entertainment Team on

    ZZ Top, Caesars Team for Jukebox Musical 'Sharp Dressed Man' (EXCLUSIVE)

    Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees ZZ Top and Caesars Entertainment are developing “Sharp Dressed Man,” a jukebox musical set to open next year in Las Vegas featuring the band’s greatest hits. Members Billy Gibbons, Dusty Hill and Frank Beard are all serving as executive producers. “Sharp Dressed Man” is described as an “outrageous, [...]

  • Williamstown Theater Festival 2016 season

    Marisa Tomei Starring in Broadway Revival of 'The Rose Tattoo'

    Marisa Tomei will star in the Broadway revival of Tennessee Williams’ “The Rose Tattoo.” The Oscar-winning actress will play Serafina, a part previously performed by the likes of Maureen Stapleton and Anna Magnani. It’s also a role that Tomei is familiar with, having starred in a Williamstown Theatre Festival production in 2016. “The Rose Tattoo” [...]

  • White Pearl review

    London Theater Review: 'White Pearl'

    Playwright Anchuli Felicia King dismantles the Asian market in this misfiring satire at London’s Royal Court Theatre. “White Pearl” makes a case that those seeking to make inroads into the Far East, perceiving a new El Dorado, are no better that colonial conquistadors of an earlier age — and entirely unequipped to understand the specifics [...]

  • Signature Theatre Celebrates Millionth Subsidized Ticket

    Signature Theatre Offers $35 Subsidized Tickets, Celebrates Millionth Sold

    Just the other night, a Manhattan cab driver told Signature Theatre executive director Harold Wolpert that he couldn’t afford to take his girlfriend to a show. In response, Wolpert motioned to his theater, saying that they offer $35 subsidized tickets. The driver said he’d try it out. “It was a great moment,” Wolpert said. “We’re [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content