×

Chile’s Sanfic, Mexico’s Morbido Fest Pact to Promote Latino Horror (EXCLUSIVE)

Mexican horror festival Morbido and Chile’s Santiago Intl. Film Festival (Sanfic) have agreed on a long-term collaboration intended to strengthen the genre film industry in Chile and across Latin America.

This partnership will see Morbido representatives attend the Sanfic industry section each year to aid in the promotion of horror projects and advise those projects on their pitch processes, production design and budgets.

The fledgling Chilean genre industry will certainly benefit from the insights provided by Morbido founder and CEO Pablo Guisa, one of the hardest working of men in horror.

His impressive network includes an actual TV network available on pay TV in a number of Latin American territories, the Morbido Fest itself, theme park curation, collaborations with Cinepolis and Incaa – through Ventana Sur’s Blood Window sidebar – and he is a member of the Federation of European Fantastic Film Festivals.

Beyond insight, each year Morbido will choose from a non-specific number of projects participating in the Sanfic Industria pitches to back to the tune of 30% of the film’s proposed final budget. The sponsorship also assures the project a commercial premiere in Mexico, representation for international sales and programming on pay TV across Latin America through the Morbido TV network.

“This was my first visit to Sanfic, and as the director of a film festival I felt at home.,” Guisa told Variety while in Santiago. “I found an industry event loaded with potential attached to an international film festival which is strategically located, both geographically and in the time of year it’s held.”

He added, “The fact that South America is a talent pool for genre cinema and that when talking with Gabriela there was all the willingness and excitement to partner with us to strengthen support for genre cinema.”

The inaugural Sanfic winner of the Morbid Fest prize was Pilar Díaz, producer of Florencia Dupont’s “Aracne,”

The project was featured by Variety earlier this week, and stood out amongst a strong group of projects, a number of which possessed strong genre elements.

“Aracne” is a dark noir feature which turns on a young female journalist at a small Santiago newspaper in the ‘40s. With little to do while caring for her catatonic mother, Beatriz begins investigating Santiago’s corrupt underground. While working the case, she notices the erratic behavior of her neighbor who brings home young men nightly, alarmed that she never sees them leave.

Things go monstrously wrong when Beatriz and the woman from across the street set their eyes on the same man.

“’Aracne’ seemed a complete project to me with very particular aesthetic characteristics that I find personally attractive,” said Guisa. “It’s a very feminine, sensual and personal film from Florence. It has all of the characteristics a first genre film needs to position the director as an important new voice.”

Popular on Variety

More Film

  • Joe Anthony Russo

    Russo Brothers to Receive Publicists Motion Picture Showman Award

    Hollywood union publicists have selected the Russo Brothers to receive the Motion Picture Showman of the Year Award. Anthony and Joe Russo, who directed “Avengers: Endgame,” will receive the award at the 57th Annual Publicists Awards ceremony on Feb. 7 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. The publicists are part of the Intl. Cinematographers Guild, IATSE [...]

  • Sylvester Stallone on Rambo's Return: A

    Sylvester Stallone on Rambo's Return: 'The Warrior Can Never Find Peace'

    Sylvester Stallone may be 73, but he’s not one to sit back in his twilight years. As his legendary body slows, his output certainly hasn’t. This Friday, “Rambo: Last Blood” hits theaters around the world – 37 years after the debut of “Rambo: First Blood.” Why bring the muscled Vietnam veteran back for a final, [...]

  • VINCENZO-NATALI

    Vincenzo Natali to Open Sitges Pitchbox (EXCLUSIVE)

    Like Ron Perlman in 2018 and Guillermo del Toro the year before, Canadian writer-director Vincenzo Natali, whose new Netflix film, an adaption of Steven King’s “In the Tall Grass” will innaugurate October’s Sitges Film Festival, is lined up to open this year’s Sitges Pitchbox, organized in by Barcelona-based platform Filmarket Hub. The Sitges Pitchbox take [...]

  • "Tezuka's Barbara" in competition at Tokyo

    ‘Tezuka’s Barbara’ and ‘A Beloved Wife’ Head for Tokyo Festival Competition

    Two Japanese films, “Tezuka’s Barbara” and “A Beloved Wife” have been selected for the main competition section of next month’s Tokyo International Film Festival. The festival will reveal the remainder of the competition and the bulk of its other selections later this month. To date the Japanese festival has only revealed its opening film (“Tora-san, [...]

  • Garin Nugroho film "Memories of my

    Indonesia Selects Controversial 'Memories of My Body' as Oscar Contender

    “Memories of My Body,” directed by Garin Nugroho, has been selected to represent Indonesia at the Academy Awards in the international feature film category (previously best foreign-language film). The announcement was made Tuesday by actress Christine Hakim representing the Indonesian Film Selection Committee. The fact-based film depicts the story of a young man from a [...]

  • Benjamin Wallfisch - scoring session, Abbey

    Composer Benjamin Wallfisch Signs With Gorfaine/Schwartz Agency

    Composer Benjamin Wallfisch has signed with the Gorfaine/Schwartz Agency (GSA) for worldwide representation, in partnership with London-based agency COOL Music Ltd. A top composer, whose scoring credits include “It Chapter Two,” Shazam!” Hellboy,” “Hidden Figures” and “Hostile Planet,” among others, Wallfisch has worked on over 75 feature films and is a member of the BAFTA [...]

  • The Moneychanger

    Toronto Film Review: ‘The Moneychanger’

    Uruguayan auteur Federico Veiroj (“The Apostate,” “Belmonte”) broadens his usual intimate dramatic scope to diminishing returns for his fifth feature, “The Moneychanger,” . Adapted from a novella by compatriot Juan Enrique Gruber, the period (mid-1950s to mid-1970s) tale centers on the eponymous character, an amoral currency exchanger, who winds up laundering some of the dirtiest [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content