×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Robert Pattinson on ‘The Lighthouse,’ Dancing With Willem Dafoe and His Love of Little Richard

Robert Pattinson may be one of the world’s biggest stars, but even he’s felt the sting of rejection.

On this week’s episode of “The Big Ticket,” Variety and iHeartRadio’s movie podcast, Pattinson tells me he was 19 years old when he was fired from a theater job just days before the show was set to open.

“I left and I was very self-pitying,” Pattinson said. “I walked out and I went to this pub by the river and got absolutely trashed, and then saw that Little Richard was playing in the South Bank in London. I went to a Little Richard concert afterwards, just wept the whole time. I was like, ‘This is the most amazing, amazing concert I’ve ever seen.’”

Turns out that Pattinson is such a big fan of Little Richard that he waited by the stage door for an hour and a half to get his autograph. “He’s great,” Pattinson said. “I love Little Richard. My talent contest in school when I was probably 14, everyone was getting up to do their thing and I played ‘Lucille.’ I played the piano so hard there was just blood all over the keys afterwards. … The next kid had to go and play the piano drenched in blood.”

Pattinson can currently be seen in Robert Eggers’ “The Lighthouse.” He and Willem Dafoe co-star as lighthouse keepers who begin to lose their minds while enduring a harrowing winter storm on a remote New England island in the 19th century.

In one scene, they’re drunk and dancing together in the lighthouse. Pattinson and Dafoe took dancing lessons together. “Willem can just do everything,” Pattinson said. “He’s really good at dancing as well; picks up this whole jig in like 10 seconds. I’m just like, ‘I can’t even do it.’ … I just remember going and saying in the classes, ‘I can’t do it.’ I’m getting really embarrassed now. My face is going very red. I’m just going to go and I’ll just do this in the park and after go off at five o’clock in the morning watching this video on my phone, by some trees, learning to jig.”

Pattinson admits he wasn’t sure what to make of “The Lighthouse” when Eggers first sent him the script: “I couldn’t quite tell how it would work. … It seemed very experimental, in the script. I mean, there was the scene when me and Willem are arguing about his cooking. There were literally two pages where both of us just saying, ‘What?’”

Next up for Pattinson is “The Batman.” “I’m glad I’ve had quite a lot of time,” he said. “I didn’t realize there were so many Batman comics. Hundreds and thousands. But I’ve been reading a lot of those, and not really just the kind of classics. I just like reading the sort of individual periodicals. It’s nice to kind of see the absolutely contemporary ones.”

You can listen to the entire interview on “The Big Ticket” below. You can also listen to “The Big Ticket” on iHeartRadio or wherever you find your favorite podcasts.

More Music

  • Queen and Slim soundtrack

    Album Review: 'Queen & Slim: The Soundtrack'

    “Queen & Slim,” the film, traffics in sudden tragedy and symbolic terror as it portrays the violence of self-defense and self-awareness in stark, painful terms. It deserves an equally audacious score and soundtrack, a job that has gone to another Devonté Hynes, the British singer, songwriter, guitarist, record producer and director in his guise of Blood [...]

  • Michael Jackson in concert in Milton

    Michael Jackson Music Biopic in the Works From 'Bohemian Rhapsody' Producer

    “Bohemian Rhapsody” producer Graham King has struck a deal with the Michael Jackson estate for the pop star’s life and music rights, with plans to make a feature film based on both. King has tapped “Gladiator” and “The Aviator” screenwriter John Logan for the project. The film currently has no studio or distributor attached. The [...]

  • Beck

    Album Review: Beck's 'Hyperspace'

    Veering dangerously close to the atom heart of the mainstream does something to an artist of adventure. It can make a superman weak in its presence, like Kryptonite (it took years and Tin Machine for Bowie to recover from “Let’s Dance”), or build a stronger artist by moving ever more consistently into success’s center square, [...]

  • The Edge, Adam Clayton and Bono

    U2 Tops Rolling Stones, Ed Sheeran as Highest-Grossing Touring Artist of the Decade

    U2 topped the Rolling Stones and Taylor Swift as the top-grossing touring artist of the 2010s, according to data from Pollstar. U2 grossed more than a billion dollars — $1,038,104,132, to be exact — although that number is likely to grow, as the group is currently on its “Joshua Tree 2019” tour in Australia, New [...]

  • Def Jam Logo

    Layoffs Hit Def Jam Records

    Def Jam Records laid off several employees this week, including executive VP of brand strategy and content Noah Callahan-Bever and OJ Lima, senior VP in that department, a source close to the situation has confirmed to Variety. A total of seven employees let go, a number that includes regional promotion staffers not based in New [...]

  • Marriage Story

    Randy Newman on Hitting the Romantic Notes of 'Marriage Story' (Exclusive Featurette)

    Noah Baumbach’s “Marriage Story” opens with a seven-minute montage. “I wanted a big, warm romantic score for the movie,” Baumbach says, of the music for his film about a couple whose marriage starts to unravel and their struggle through divorce. “The picture begins with a seven-minute montage. It introduces themes that are such used throughout [...]

  • Tom Waits Come on Up to

    Album Review: 'Come On Up to the House: Women Sing Waits'

    The truest testament to a song’s power is how it plays with others. Songs written by the performer are more likely to land in the singer’s stylistic and vocal wheelhouse; take away that crutch to witness the song’s true strength and character. So while Tom Waits’ genius has been beyond dispute for at least a [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content