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MGM Hires Robert Marick to Expand Consumer Products

Metro Goldwyn Mayer has hired industry veteran Robert Marick as executive VP of global consumer products and experiences.

In his new role, Marick is responsible for overseeing the expansion of MGM’s traditional merchandise, interactive and consumer products business. He’s also developing a global strategy with a focus on core consumer products licensing, digital and gaming, location-based entertainment and direct-to-consumer businesses.

Marick will report to Christopher Brearton, MGM’s chief operating officer. Marick has worked for Walt Disney Company, Twentieth Century Fox, Time Warner Inc. (now WarnerMedia), Mattel, and Discovery.

“Robert has a proven track record of taking complex entertainment properties and translating them into impactful consumer goods and experiences,” said Brearton. “His extensive knowledge of the industry and global marketing expertise will enable him to provide a unique perspective as we look to enhance MGM’s position as a global leader in consumer products and experiences.”

Marick will be working on MGM brands including “The Addams Family,” “Legally Blonde,” “The Handmaid’s Tale,” “Vikings,” “James Bond,” and “Pink Panther.” He began his career working in toys at Mattel and managing Fox’s multibillion-dollar global licensing business, and implemented global franchise strategies for “Avatar,” “Ice Age,” and “The Simpsons.”

Most recently, Marick oversaw the global location-based entertainment and North America consumer products businesses at Discovery Inc., where he developed and executed global location-based entertainment and merchandise plans for Discovery, Discovery Adventures, Discovery Kids, and Animal Planet.

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