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‘Mad Max: Fury Road’ Sound Mixer Gregg Rudloff Dies at 63

Gregg Rudloff, who won Academy Awards for sound mixing “Mad Max: Fury Road,” “The Matrix,” and “Glory” and was nominated four other times, died in Los Angeles on Jan. 6. He was 63.

A representative for the Los Angeles County Coroner’s office told Variety that the office is treating his death as a possible suicide with results of an autopsy pending.

Rudloff was nominated for an Oscar for “American Sniper,” Best Picture winner “Argo,” “Flags of Our Fathers” and “The Perfect Storm.” He also won an Emmy for sound mixing “An Early Frost” in 1985.

Rudloff followed his father, sound engineer Tex Rudloff, into the business. The elder Rudloff was nominated for a sound Oscar for “The Buddy Holly Story” and had credits on “They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?,” “Taxi Driver,” and Clint Eastwood’s “The Outlaw Josey Wales.”

Gregg Rudloff’s earliest credit was on 1982’s “Honkytonk Man” for Eastwood, followed by “Risky Business,” “Footloose,” “This Is Spinal Tap,” “Prizzi’s Honor,” “Stand by Me” and “The Princess Bride” during the next five years. Later credits included “Fried Green Tomatoes,” “White Men Can’t Jump,” “Space Jam,”  “Mr. & Mrs. Smith” and “Superman Returns.”

In addition to “Flags of Our Fathers” and “American Sniper,” Gregg Rudloff worked on many other Eastwood films, including “J. Edgar,” “Invictus,” “Gran Torino,” “Letters From Iwo Jima,” “True Crime” and “Absolute Power.”

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