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Denis Villeneuve’s ‘Dune’ Gets November 2020 Release Date

Warner Bros. has scheduled Legendary’s science-fiction tentpole “Dune” for a Nov. 20, 2020, release in 3D and Imax.

“Aquaman” star Jason Momoa is in negotiations to join the “Dune” reboot with Timothee Chalamet, Javier Bardem, Rebecca Ferguson, Stellan Skarsgard, Dave Bautista, Josh Brolin, Oscar Isaac, and Zendaya. Production is expected to launch in the spring in Budapest and Jordan.

“Dune” centers on the battle for control of the desert planet Arrakis. Chalamet is playing the leader Paul Atreides, who is forced to escape into the wastelands, where he eventually becomes the ruler of the nomadic tribes.

“Arrival” and “Blade Runner 2049” director Denis Villeneuve is helming and co-writing the script with Eric Roth and Jon Spaihts. The movie will be produced by Villeneuve, Mary Parent, and Cale Boyter, with Brian Herbert, Byron Merritt, Thomas Tull, and Kim Herbert serving as executive producers.

“Dune” is based on the 1965 Frank Herbert novel. The film is the first title to land on the Nov. 20, 2020, which is the weekend before Thanksgiving.

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Warner Bros. also announced Friday that it has set release dates of Aug. 14 for British coming-of-age story “Blinded by the Light,” which it bought at the Sundance Film Festival, and Nov. 1 for Edward Norton’s drama “Motherless Brooklyn.” Norton plays a private detective trying to solve the murder of his mentor and friend, played by Bruce Willis.

David Lynch directed the first movie version of “Dune,” which was released in 1984 and starred Kyle MacLachlan as Paul Atreides. It was a commercial failure with a $30 million gross on a $40 million budget.

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