×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

‘Twentieth Century,’ ‘Dove and the Wolf,’ ‘Hurricane Season’ Win Los Cabos Festival

LOS CABOS  —  “The Twentieth Century,” Matthew Rankin’s crazed retelling of Canadian history, won the main Los Cabos Competition this Saturday, beating out a prestige lineup of some of the most notable festival standouts of the year.

The win at Los Cabos, whose competition is focused on movies from the U.S., Mexico and Canada, adds to “The Twentieth Century’s” Toronto Best Canadian First Feature prize for a feature made with high style, shot like 1940s melodrama, with a box-like Academy ratio.

Mexico Primero, a showcase of first or second-time Mexican features, was won by “The Dove and the Wolf,” the feature debut of Carlos Lenin, which world premiered at this year’s Locarno Film  Festival in Filmmakers of the Present. A young couple love story, “The Dove and the Wolf” is distinguished by its context, a grimy small town assailed by cartel violence, and its unyielding use of static camera sequence shots which symbolically trap its young working class protagonists.

Two prime prizes in Mexico Primero – its Audience Award and

Popular on Variety

Art Kingdom award – were won by “Birdwatching,” a Los Cabos world premiere marking the second fiction feature of Mexican-Canadian Andrea Martínez Crowther after her feature debut, “Cosas insignificantes,” executive produced by Guillermo del Toro.

In industry prizes, the biggest winner in films in development, scooping two kudos, was “Hurricane Season,” the latest link-up between Mexican production powerhouse Woo Films and a distinguished Mexican woman filmmaker after Natalia Beristáin’s “The Eternal Feminine” and Alejandra Marquez’s “The Good Girls,” “Hurricane Season” marks a big step-up for Mexico’s Elisa Miller, director of the 2007 Cannes Palme d’Or-winning short “Ver Llover” and admired 2008 debut “Alicia, Go Yonder,” an adaptation of Fernanda Melchor’s fiction work of the same name, greeted by critics with a rare unanimity as the great Mexican novel of 2017.

A forceful portrait of a village’s dirt poverty, bigotry, pervasive gender abuse, violence and carnal appetites, “Hurricane Season” looks set to confirm Miler’s emergence as not only an auteur but director of large style.

Two other big wins – Cannes Marché du Film Award and the newly-created Piano Award, granted by the Mexican production-distribution house, went respectively to Andrés Kaiser’s “Precious Blood” and producer Nicole Maynard and Mauricio Calderón Rico’s “All the Fires.”

“Precious Blood” represents Mexican director Kaiser and producer Maynard’s follow-up to Los Cabos Mexican film winner “Feral” and another horror thriller, this time set in 18th century about a nun who claims to have visions of the devil and be witness to serial murders.

Produced by Daniel Loustaunau, “All the Fires,” a section favorite, is a coming of age story of a young pyromanic who, disavowing his homosexuality, leaves home after his mother takes a lover, lights fires as a cry for help.

The major Works in Progress” Award went to one of the frontrunners for many attendees, Helmut Dosantos’ singular “Gods of Mexico” a documentary feature composed of extraordinary collage of rural scenes, immaculately composed and some shot black-and-white. These capture millennial rites – a Devil’s Dance, for example – and, far more damningly, labor practices – salt pans and a furnace – and living conditions which still haven’t changed in centuries. Such is Mexican life far from the cosmopolitan globalized world, one sequence description suggests.

“Flora y Fauna, “ the ninth fiction feature from Nicolas Pereda (“Perpetuum Mobile”), nabbed a Cinecolor Mexico Prize.

Some way from completion, and punching way above its weight in the final force of its narrative, compared to its budget, the benighted hamlet tale, mixing a downbeat family reunion drama framing a hair-raising if nominally fictional abduction tale, portrays a Mexico whose reality and imagination has been eviscerated by its drug wars and violence.

The second feature from Bruno Santamaría Razo, sitting on the borderlands between documentary and violence, took the tale of a gay teen’s in a village ravaged by homophobia and homicide, which makes his decision to come out all the more courageous and affecting.

2019 8TH LOS CABOS INTL. FILM FESTIVAL PRIZEWINNERS

LOS CABOS COMPETITION

“The Twentieth Century,” Matthew Rankin, Canada

MEXICO PRIMERO

CINEMEX AWARD

“The Dove and the Wolf,” Carlos Lenin

CINEMEX AUDIENCE AWARD

“Birdwatching,” Andrea Martínez Crowther

ART KINGDOM TRAILER PRIZE

“Birdwatching”

GABRIEL FIGUEROA FILM FUND AWARDS

WORK IN PROGRESS AWARDS

LOS CABOS WORK IN PROGRESS AWARD

“Gods of Mexico,” Helmut Dosantos, Mexico

CHEMISTRY + DISRUPTIVA FILM & SOUND AWARD

“Things We Never Dare to Do,” Bruno Santamaría Razo, Mexico

CINECOLOR MEXICO AWARD

“Flora y Fauna,” Nicolás Pereda, Mexico

FILM IN DEVELOPMENT AWARDS

MARCHE DU FILM AWARD

“Precious Blood,” Andrés Kaiser, México

PIANO AWARD

“All of the Fires,” Mauricio Calderón Rico, Canada

CTT EXP & RENTALS AWARD

“Hurricane Season,” Elisa Miller, Mexico

TALENT ON THE ROAD/ WORLD TALENT HOUSE AWARD

“Hurricane Season”

TV SERIES IN DEVELOPMENT

CTT EXP & RENTALS AWARD

“Mother Dough,” Mercedes Córdova, Argentina

ART KINGDOM PROMO TRAILER AWARD

“My Insides are the Strangest and Most Beautiful Thing in the World,” Nicolas Ruiz, Mexico

CINECOLOR MÉXICO TV TRÁILER AWARD

“Aventureology,”  Ricardo Castro, Mexico

LOS CABOS INTERNATIONAL STAR AWARD

Eiza González

3RD FILM CRITICS AWARD

Amira Ortiz

More Film

  • ‘Gravedigger,’ ‘Zanka Contact,’ ‘Sweet Annoyance’ Win

    ‘The Gravedigger,’ ‘Zanka Contact’ and ‘Sweet Annoyance’ Win Top Prizes at 2nd Atlas Workshops

    Djibouti’s “The Gravedigger,” Morocco’s “Zanka Contact” and Ethiopia’s “Sweet Annoyance” were among the major winners in the post-production and development categories of the second edition of the Marrakech Film Festival’s Atlas Workshops. “The Gravedigger,” by Khadar Ahmed, and “Zanka Contact,” by Ismaël el Iraki, won the top awards – €20,000 ($22,000) and $11,000 respectively – [...]

  • Robert De Niro, Martin Scorsese and

    Film News Roundup: Leonardo DiCaprio Presenting Robert De Niro SAG Life Achievement Award

    In today’s film news roundup, Leonardo DiCaprio will present Robert De Niro with his SAG Life Achievement Award, the Oliver Sacks documentary finds a home and UCLA’s School of Theater, Film and Television gets a new dean. AWARD PRESENTATION Leonardo DiCaprio has been selected to present Robert De Niro the SAG Life Achievement Award  at [...]

  • KARNAWAL

    ‘Karnawal,’ ‘Restless,’ ‘Summer White,’ ‘Firsts’ Win Big at Ventana Sur

    BUENOS AIRES  — With Ventana Sur now firing on multiple cylinders, featuring pix-in post or project competitions for not only art films but also genre pics and animation – two sectors embraced by young creators in Latin America – “Karnawal,” “Restless,” “Summer White” and  “Firsts” proved big winners among Ventana Sur’s arthouse and animation competitions, [...]

  • (center) George MacKay as Schofield in

    From "1917" to "Jojo Rabbit," Composers of Some of the Year's Top Scores Talk Shop

    “1917,” Thomas Newman The 20-year collaboration of director Sam Mendes and composer Thomas Newman has encompassed midlife crisis (“American Beauty”), crime in the Depression (“Road to Perdition”), the Gulf War (“Jarhead”), marriage in the 1950s (“Revolutionary Road”) and two James Bond adventures (“Skyfall,” “Spectre”). Now they’ve tackled World War I, with “1917,” but Mendes’ much-talked-about [...]

  • Billy Magnussen Aladdin

    'Aladdin' Spinoff With Billy Magnussen's Character in the Works for Disney Plus

    Disney is developing a spinoff of its live-action “Aladdin” with Billy Magnussen reprising his Prince Anders character. The unnamed project is in early development for the studio’s recently launched Disney Plus streaming service. Disney has hired Jordan Dunn and Michael Kvamme to write a script centered on the haughty Prince Anders, one of Princess Jasmine’s [...]

  • ROAD TRIP – In Disney and

    Disney Boasts a Bevy of Hopefuls for Oscar's Original Song Race

    When the Academy announces its shortlist for song nominations on Dec. 16, you can be certain that at least one Disney song will be on it and probably more. Disney songs have been nominated 33 times in the past 30 years, winning 12 of the gold statuettes. This year, the studio has at least four [...]

  • Innovative Scores Elevated the Year's Documentaries

    Innovative Scores Elevated the Year's Documentaries

    It’s next to impossible for a documentary score to be Oscar-nominated alongside the dozens of fictional narratives entered each year. But it did happen, just once: In 1975, composer Gerald Fried was nominated for his music for “Birds Do It, Bees Do It,” a documentary on the mating habits of animals. Fried, now 91, perhaps [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content