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San Sebastian Adds Alice Winocour, Malgorzata Szumowska, Sarah Gavron to Main Comp

The Darren Aronofsky-produced Brazilian title “Pacified,” by American director Paxton Winters, Alice Winocour’s French-German astronaut drama “Proxima” and Polish film director Małgorzata Szumowska’s psychological thriller “The Other Lamb” are among the six final competition selections for September’s 67th San Sebastian Film Festival.

Also vying for San Sebastian’s Golden Shell will be U.K. drama “Rocks,” from “Suffragette” director Sarah Gavron, Sonthar Gyal’s Chinese production “Lhamo And Skalbe” and Gonçalo Waddington’s Portuguese-German kidnap mystery “Patrick.”

Adding three works from female filmmakers, San Sebastian has brought the number of competition contenders directed by women to six, just over one-third of the section.

“Pacified,” starring Bukassa Kabengele, Cassia Nascimento and José Loreto, centers on the  friendship between a street-smart 13-year-old girl and an ex-trafficker who live in a Rio favela.

In “Proxima,” Eva Green stars as an astronaut and single mother who signs up for a year-long space mission, a move that not only pits her against a chauvinistic all-male crew, but also her young daughter. Matt Dillon and Germany’s Lars Eidinger also star.

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“Patrick” tells the story of an 8-year-old who is kidnapped in Portugal in the spring of 1999 and reappears 12 years later in a jail cell in Paris. The film features Hugo Fernandes, Teresa Sobral and Carla Maciel.

In “Rocks,” starring Bukky Bakray, Kosar Ali and D’Angelou Osei Kissiedu, a popular teenage girl with big dreams and an adoring little brother sees her world turn upside down when her mother suddenly leaves.

THE OTHER LAMB

“Lhamo And Skalbe,” with Sonam Nyima, Dekyid and Sechok Gyal, turns on a man who is unable to marry his betrothed due to a previous marriage, so sets off in search of his estranged wife in the hopes of getting a divorce.

Described as a haunting and nightmarish tale, “The Other Lamb” centers in of a young girl born into an alternative religion – all women and female children – who live in a rural compound led by a man known only as Shepherd. Raffey Cassidy, Michiel Huisman and Denise Gough star.

A total of 17 productions are vying for San Sebastian’s Golden Shell at what is the highest profile movie event in the Spanish-speaking world. The San Sebastian Film Festival runs Sept. 20-28.

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