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Redbox, the DVD-kiosk and digital on-demand network, is opening its checkbook to acquire and produce original TV shows and movies.

The company announced the formation of Redbox Entertainment, a division that will fund, develop and produce projects across multiple genres, with a focus on action, comedy, and suspense/thrillers. Redbox said it is already in talks on picking up individual projects, both directly and through distribution partners and channels.

To spearhead the initiative, Redbox has hired Marc Danon as a senior adviser to head content acquisition for Redbox Entertainment, reporting directly to CEO Galen Smith. A 20-year Hollywood veteran, Danon most recently led acquisitions at Broad Green Pictures and prior to that was Lionsgate’s senior VP of acquisitions and business development.

At Lionsgate, Danon worked on the acquisition of titles including “Kevin Hart: Let Me Explain,” “John Wick,” “Dear White People,” “A Most Wanted Man” and “The Skeleton Twins.”

“The formation of Redbox Entertainment leverages our deep insights to bring projects that we know appeal to our audience to deliver additional value and entertainment,” Smith said in a statement. About Danon, Smith added, “He’s a talented creative with an impressive track record as a champion of films that catch fire with audiences; and a skilled executive adept at maximizing distribution opportunities and cultivating strategic partnerships.”

Redbox dipped its toe into the originals waters earlier this year, with the exclusive release of “Benjamin,” an R-rated dark comedy directed by and starring Bob Saget about a family dealing with a teen’s drug addiction.

Content acquired by Redbox Entertainment will be available physically at Redbox kiosks and digitally via Redbox On Demand, as well as in downstream windows post-Redbox release.

Redbox claims to reach 50 million consumers across the U.S., through about 41,000 kiosks and its Redbox On Demand digital service. The company says customers have made more than 6 billion rentals to date, offering new release movies and video games.