×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Netflix Joins the Motion Picture Association of America

UPDATED WASHINGTON — Netflix has joined the Motion Picture Association of America, a move that reflects its evolution as a major player in the movie business.

The MPAA currently has six major studios as members, and it collected about $38 million in membership dues in 2017, according to its most recent filing with the IRS. But it faces the loss of one of the legacy studio members, Twentieth Century Fox, after the merger of many of its assets with Disney is completed.

“On behalf of the MPAA and its member companies, I am delighted to welcome Netflix as a partner,” MPAA chairman and CEO Charles Rivkin said in a statement. “All of our members are committed to pushing the film and television industry forward, in both how we tell stories and how we reach audiences. Adding Netflix will allow us to even more effectively advocate for the global community of creative storytellers, and I look forward to seeing what we can all achieve together.”

Ted Sarandos, chief content officer for Netflix, said, “Joining the Motion Picture Association further exemplifies our commitment to ensuring the vibrancy of these creative industries and the many talented people who work in them all over the world.”

The streaming giant received its first best picture Oscar nomination on Tuesday for “Roma.”

Netflix would be the first internet company, with its origins in Silicon Valley, to join the MPAA.

With the growth of streaming services and other content businesses, the MPAA has in recent years faced questions of whether it should expand its membership. According to sources, there has been some disagreement among the board members as to whether to take such a step.

While the tech industry has often been at odds with the MPAA on issues like copyright and trade, their sentiments could start to align as Netflix, YouTube, Amazon and Apple make greater investments in content, and as major media companies The Walt Disney Co., WarnerMedia and NBCUniversal prepare to launch their own subscription streaming services.

As it has expanded production, Netflix has found many of its policy concerns in sync with those of other content firms.

In 2017, Netflix and Amazon joined with studios in the formation of a global anti-piracy coalition, the Alliance for Creativity and Entertainment. The group has pursued legal action against piracy sites.

It recently left another trade association, the Internet Association, which represents many tech giants like Google, Amazon, Snap and Facebook. Netflix had been a champion for the FCC to pass a robust set of net neutrality rules in 2015, but those were overturned when Republicans gained control of the commission two years later. The MPAA has largely stayed out of the net neutrality debate.

The MPAA reported total revenue of $71.7 million in 2017, the bulk of it collected through membership dues, film rating service fees and title registration. It ended the year with a $4.4 million surplus.

The amount it has collected in membership dues has dropped in recent years, from about $65 million in 2014 and 2015, to $38 million in the most recent year, according to the IRS filings.

 

More Biz

  • Best Books of 2019

    The Best Books of 2019

    Whether you experience stressful days due to your professional position, your demanding family, or simply the barrage of never-ending depressing news, there is often no better way to unwind than with a good book. Letting your imagination wander into a new world unlike your own can be exciting, it can be thought-provoking, but perhaps most [...]

  • Makan Delrahim

    Antitrust Experts Decry DOJ's 'Outrageous' Stance in Writers Guild Case

    Several experts on antitrust law have expressed concern at the stance taken by the Department of Justice in the ongoing legal feud between Hollywood writers and their agents. Three agencies have sued the Writers Guild of America for alleged violations of antitrust law. A key hearing will be held in federal court on Friday, as [...]

  • Bob Bakish Viacom CEO

    Shares of ViacomCBS Dip in First-Day Early Trading

    Shares of the newly combined ViacomCBS were off in early trading, a sign that Wall Street continues to look for new signs of growth after two of the best-known names in entertainment merged to vie with bigger rivals. Shares of the company’s new common stock were off 59 cents, or 1.38%, in late-morning trading on [...]

  • David Cohen (l) Executive Vice President

    Comcast Veteran David Cohen to Step Down

    Longtime Comcast executive David Cohen is stepping down from his operational role overseeing public policy, government relations, diversity and other key corporate functions for the media giant. Comcast said Thursday in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing that Cohen, senior executive VP and chief diversity officer, will step down from his operational responsibilities as of [...]

  • Lamar Jackson 49ers

    49ers Broadcaster Suspended After Lamar Jackson 'Dark Skin' Comments

    The San Francisco 49ers have suspended one of its radio color hosts, Tim Ryan, after he made a comment about Baltimore Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson, saying that he is skilled at faking handoffs because of his “dark skin color with a dark football.” Ryan made the comments early on on KNBR’s “Murph and Mac” morning [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content