×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Mac Miller Found Dead of Suspected Overdose at 26

Rapper Mac Miller was found dead on Friday of an apparent overdose, Variety has confirmed. He was 26.

He was found in his Studio City, Calif., home at about noon. His family released a statement about his death on Friday afternoon.

“Malcolm McCormick, known and adored by fans as Mac Miller, has tragically passed away at the age of 26,” reads the statement. “He was a bright light in this world for his family, friends, and fans.”

Miller had struggled with substance abuse in the past. Just last month, the Los Angeles Attorney’s Office officially charged the rapper with a DUI stemming from a car accident in May in the San Fernando Valley.

He had been open about his struggles previously, referencing drug abuse and death in his music, particularly in the deeply personal 2014 mixtape “Faces.” “I used to rap super openly about really dark s—,” he told Vulture in a profile that published on Thursday. “That’s what I was experiencing at the time. That’s fine, that’s good, that’s life. It should be all the emotions.”

Miller had been in a long-term relationship with Ariana Grande, which ended this past May. Shortly after his car accident and arrest that same month, Grande tweeted “pls take care of yourself.”

When discussing their breakup, Grande made it clear addiction was part of the reason for their split. “I am not a babysitter or a mother and no woman should feel that they need to be,” she wrote on Twitter. “I have cared for him and tried to support his sobriety and prayed for his balance for years (and always will of course) but shaming/blaming women for a man’s inability to keep his s— together is a very major problem.”

Miller had just been preparing to embark on a U.S. tour after releasing his most recent album, “Swimming,” on Aug. 3. It was set to kick off on Oct. 27 in San Francisco.

“I just wanna go on tour,” he tweeted on Thursday. “The show is going to be special every night. I wish it started tomorrow.”

“Swimming” debuted at No. 3 on the Billboard 200, supported by singles “Small Worlds,” “Self Care,” and “What’s the Use?” In “Self Care,” he references his DUI and arrest, rapping, “That Mercedes drove me crazy, I was speedin’ / Somebody save me from myself, yeah / Tell them they can take that bullsh– elsewhere / Self care, we gonna be good / Hell yeah, they lettin’ me go.”

In the music video for the single, he also uses a knife to carve the words “Memento mori” — “remember you have to die” in Latin — into the lid of the coffin.

Aside from his music, Miller’s reality show “Mac Miller and the Most Dope Family” ran for two seasons on MTV2. He also appeared in 2013’s “Scary Movie 5” in a small role alongside Snoop Dogg.

Miller, a Pittsburgh native, decided to focus on hip-hop when he was in high school. In 2007, when he was just 15, he released the mixtape “But My Mackin’ Ain’t Easy” under the name EZ Mac. In the following couple of years, he released two solo mixtapes, “The Jukebox: Prelude to Class Clown” and “The High Life,” in addition to one with rap group the Ill Spoken. He signed a deal with indie record label Rostrum Records in 2010.

The rapper led his 2011 mixtape, “Best Day Ever,” with the single “Donald Trump,” which marked the first time Miller hit the Billboard 100. It focused on Miller’s ambitions to become as financially successful as Trump, and resurfaced in popularity when Trump hit the presidential campaign trial in 2016. Miller, however, has since said that he was not a political supporter of Trump, describing him as “an egomaniacal, attention-thirsty, psychopathic, power-hungry, delusional waste of skin and bones” during the campaign, and sparking a Twitter war.

His first studio album, “Blue Slide Park,” came in 2011, led by the single “Frick Park Market.” It debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard album chart, becoming the first independently released debut album to do so since 1995.

He released “Watching Movies With the Sound Off,” his second album, in 2013. It was largely produced by himself, under the pseudonym Larry Fisherman, and featured guest appearances such as Schoolboy Q, Action Bronson, and Tyler, the Creator. Critics handed better reviews to his sophomore album, which debuted at No. 3 on the Billboard 200. That same year, an appearance on Grande’s single “The Way” notched Miller his first Top 10 single, and he continued to develop as a producer, releasing the largely instrumental collection “Run-On Sentences Vol. 2” and producing a mixtape for Vince Staples.

In 2014, Miller left Rostrum and, after independently releasing “Faces,” he revealed that his label Remember Music had signed a deal with Warner Bros. Records for a reported $10 million. Tom Corson, co-chairman and COO of Warner Bros. Records, released a statement about his death on Friday afternoon.

“All of us at Warner Bros. Records are deeply shocked and saddened by the tragic news of Mac Miller’s untimely passing,” reads the statement. “Mac was a hugely gifted and inspiring artist, with a pioneering spirit and a sense of humor that touched everyone he met. Mac’s death is a devastating loss and cuts short a life and a talent of huge potential, where the possibilities felt limitless. We join all of his fans across the globe in extending our thoughts and prayers to his family and friends.”

Miller released his third album, “GO:OD AM,” in 2015, with the two singles, “100 Grandkids” and “Weekend.” “The Divine Feminine,” his fourth studio album, came the following year, featuring guest appearances from Grande, Kendrick Lamar, Anderson Paak, and Ty Dolla Sign.

As Miller’s profile rose, though, he appeared in more tabloid headlines. In addition to his legal troubles — which, along with the DUI, included a 2012 lawsuit from producer Lord Finesse that was eventually settled out of court — his relationship and eventual breakup with Grande stayed in the news. In his Vulture profile, Miller opened up about how he approaches his public image.

“It just seems exhausting to always be battling something … to always be battling for what you think your image is supposed to be,” he said. “You’re never going to be able to get anything across. It’s never gonna be the real … No one’s gonna ever really know me.”

More Music

  • Ric Ocasek House

    Now Separated, Ric Ocasek and Paulina Porizkova Seek Sale of Manhattan Townhouse

    Almost a year after top-earning 1980s supermodel Paulina Porizkova announced, via social media, that she and veteran New Wave rock star Ric Ocasek of the Cars had “peacefully” split up a year earlier, following almost three decades of marriage, the erstwhile couple’s Manhattan home, a handsome townhouse on a pretty, tree-lined block in the Gramercy [...]

  • Alfonso Cuaron's 'Roma' Companion Album to

    Alfonso Cuarón's New 'Roma' Album to Feature Beck, Patti Smith, El-P, T Bone Burnett

    Not to be outdone by Ariana Grande’s impending record news, filmmaker Alfonso Cuarón has announced the track list and release date for his new album, which, coincidentally, is also due Feb. 8. He’s the curator of “Music Inspired by the Film Roma,” which was already teased by a Billie Eilish track, and is now revealed [...]

  • cats logo

    As 'Cats' Starts Production, Downtown Lands Admin Deal for Andrew Lloyd Webber's Music (EXCLUSIVE)

    Downtown Music Publishing has entered into a multi-year publishing administration deal with Faber Music, which represents the musical repertoire from “Cats,” the beloved and long-running Broadway sensation currently being turned into a feature film starring Taylor Swift, Jennifer Hudson, James Corden, Idris Elba and Judi Dench, among others. The Universal picture, directed by Tom Hooper, recently [...]

  • Songs for Screens Powered by Mac

    Songs for Screens: Beyond 'Bohemian Rhapsody,' 2018 Was a Record Sync Year for Queen

    As “Bohemian Rhapsody” approaches a landmark $800 million at the global box office, another Queen milestone quietly took place in 2018. With appearances in nationwide campaigns for Amazon, Ram Trucks, Google, Peloton, Silk Almondmilk and many more, Queen’s music was licensed by more blue-chip brands than any other calendar year. And in the first few [...]

  • Erykah Badu Gets in Twitter Fight

    Erykah Badu Gets in Twitter Fight With ‘Surviving R. Kelly’ Executive Producer

    Three days after making a widely criticized statement that she was “praying for” R. Kelly, Erykah Badu got into a Twitter spat with Dream Hampton, executive producer of “Surviving R. Kelly,” the Lifetime docuseries that has rallied public outcry against the singer over longstanding sexual-misconduct accusations against him. It all began when a user named [...]

  • Kew Media Sells Beatles, Pendergrass, Hip-Hop

    NATPE: Kew Media Sells Beatles, Pendergrass, and Hip-Hop Shows into Latin America

    Kew Media Distribution has sold over 100 hours of programming to buyers in Latin America it announced at the ongoing NATPE programming market in Miami. Pay-TV platform operator DirecTV has bought a package from Kew that includes feature documentaries “Active Measures,” about Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election, and “Divide and Conquer: The Story [...]

  • Jimi Hendrix sound check Monterey Pop

    Film Constellation Adds ‘Show Me the Picture’ to Berlin Market Slate (EXCLUSIVE)

    London-based sales and financing house Film Constellation has added Alfred George Bailey’s feature documentary “Show Me the Picture: The Story of Jim Marshall” to its Berlin market slate, ahead of the film’s SXSW premiere. Submarine Entertainment is handling distribution in North America. The film charts the life of American photographer James Joseph Marshall, whose work [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content