×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

‘American Idol’ Recap: Katy Perry Calls Finale Part One a ‘Disaster’

Sunday nights live taping of “American Idol” will determine who takes home the crown this season.

During part one of the finale the final three contestants, Gabby Barrett, Caleb Lee Hutchinson and Maddie Poppe each performed three songs to vie for the top spot. Voting takes place overnight until Monday at 9 am ET. One contender will be eliminated during the first hour of Monday nights taping, leaving the winner to be announced during the second hour.

This week, iHeartRadio host Bobby Bones mentored Barrett, Hutchinson and Poppe, whose set lists included an original single, a repeat of their favorite song performed so far and a hometown dedication, after going back to their respective hometowns to perform for their communities.

Barrett, who dedicated Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin’” to her hometown of Pittsburgh, Pa., was surprised to find that she was singing in front of Steve Perry, former Journey lead singer who fronted the band as they made the song a hit. Perry congratulated Barrett on her performance, saying it was the best version he had ever heard.

“That was insane. I was like, ‘Oh my gosh.’ I had no idea he was coming, that was such an honor. He said that my version was the best version he’s ever heard. Just seeing him here and being able to sing his song in front of him was such an honor,” Barrett said.

Poppe, an Iowa native, dedicated Fleetwood Mac’s “Landslide” to her hometown of Clarksville. “They said, ‘You need to pick a hometown dedication song,’ and I thought, that was the very first song that I ever sang in front of my town, like, that I ever sung for anyone. I couldn’t even play guitar at the time, so I sang it as a duet with my sister. I was shaking and so scared and my whole community was there, and so I was like, ‘I think that I should do that again and do it on a national level now.’ I didn’t realize when we put it together that it’s in the exact same key that I originally sang it in, which is really weird because I usually sing it a lot lower.”

The three finalists performed their original songs first, much to the dismay of judge Katy Perry, who qualified round one as a “disaster,” stating that none of the contestants seemed comfortable on stage. Fellow judges Lionel Richie and Luke Bryan agreed with Perry’s evaluation.

Poppe said, “I am not nervous anymore. I feel like the weight has just been lifted. I’ll say that I don’t think it was my strongest night, and I think honestly all three of us have had stronger nights. That first round was really rough, we weren’t feeling confident, I mean, the words were up on the teleprompter and it was like, we weren’t even comfortable. We really weren’t comfortable with these songs and it was rough.”

Bones was open about disagreeing with the judges, “So a couple things, one, I think in [the judges] mind, they were already going, ‘This is a new song, they’re probably not gonna be that good.’ So listen it wasn’t the best, but to say it was a disaster, come on. Also to be fair I was watching it on a screen, so I saw what America was seeing, I don’t know what it sounded like in the room. Maybe in the room it sounded like a disaster. So I did disagree with their opinion and they disagreed back and that’s okay.”

Richie stressed the importance of song writing, “Well that’s everything. Songwriters to me, you control your own destiny. And you don’t have to go and ask somebody, ‘Well can you write me a hit record?’ One thing that happened to me with the Commodores, one time we were sitting on a flight, I won’t tell the name of the group, but they came and did a song just like the Commodores, and we toured with them on the same tour – I would never throw them under the bus – and then all of a sudden, the lead singer came up to the front of the plane and he said, ‘Could you do us a favor, could you write our next hit record?’ And we said, ‘You mean you don’t have your next hit record?’ (laughs).”

Bryan echoed that sentiment, saying, “Songwriting is your fingerprint. If you ever think you’re gonna lean on someone to say it exactly like you’re gonna say it, nobody’s gonna say it like you’re gonna say it and at the end of the day that’s truly what your artistry is.”

POPULAR ON VARIETY:

More TV

  • James Holzhauer $2 million

    'Jeopardy!' Champion James Holzhauer Hits $2 Million Winnings Milestone

    This current “Jeopardy!” player has just won over $2 million on the popular game show. Who is James Holzhauer? The 34 year old professional sports gambler from Las Vegas has hit a “Jeopardy!” milestone by becoming only the second person in the show’s history to win over $2 million in regular season play. Holzhauer won [...]

  • Kanye West Shares a Memory of

    Kanye West Shares a Touching Memory of His Mother in Letterman Interview

    In a preview of David Letterman’s interview with Kanye West, which begins streaming next Friday, May 31, the musician’s wife Kim Kardashian West, tweeted a clip of him sharing a touching memory of his mother, Donda, who died in 2007 after a surgical procedure. While his wife looks on smiling, West answers Letterman’s question about [...]

  • CNN Lays Off Some Health Journalism

    CNN Lays Off Some Health Journalism Staffers (Report)

    CNN has laid off a handful of staffers from its health-journalism unit after deciding to place its health, climate and Southeastern newsgathering operations under a single aegis, according to a report in TVNewser. A CNN spokesperson could not be reached for immediate comment, but a the network said in a statement to the outlet: ” [...]

  • Henry Ian Cusick

    'Lost' Star Henry Ian Cusick Signs With Buchwald (EXCLUSIVE)

    Henry Ian Cusick, best known for playing Desmond on the hit ABC series “Lost,” is signing with talent agency Buchwald for representation. Cusick also starred in the CW sci-fi/drama “The 100” and was most recently seen in the Fox series “The Passage.” His other notable television credits include “Scandal,” “24,” “Fringe,” “The Mentalist,” “Body of [...]

  • Bryan Cranston First Time in Variety

    Bryan Cranston on His Early Roles, Dealing With Rejection and His 'Erasable Mind'

    Following his 2014 Tony Award for best actor as President Lyndon B. Johnson in Robert Schenkkan’s play “All the Way,” Bryan Cranston is looking to add to his trophy collection this year with his performance as Howard Beale in “Network.” The deranged anchorman — who’s famously “mad as hell and not going to take this [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content