×

‘The Hate U Give’ Novelist Reflects on Big Screen Adaptation Process

When discussions of a possible film adaptation of “The Hate U Give” began, I mentally prepared myself to let go.
In some ways, for authors it’s like placing a child in someone else’s hands to raise, nurture and prepare for the world. The key is to place it in the right hands. From my very first conversations with director George Tillman Jr., screenwriter Audrey Wells and later screenwriter Tina Mabry, I knew they were the perfect people to “raise” this adaptation. They not only loved the source material but respected it. Even more, they respected me as the one who initially birthed it.

Over the course of a year, there were face-to-face meetings and phone conversations in which all parties involved
in the scriptwriting process discussed everything with me, from big picture aspects to minute details that may not even be noticeable. Wells specifically yearned to know all that she could about these characters and the world I created, while recognizing that it was a reflection of the world we live in.

Though the characters’ experiences were different from her own, Wells did what writers and, honestly, society as a whole must do — she listened intently and made it her goal to understand as best as she could. Her genuine empathy and love translated beautifully into the screenplay. Combined with the nuances and voice provided by Mabry, the final script proved to me that I truly did place the adaptation in the best hands possible. Collectively, our goal was for the adaptation to have so many of the same genetics as the book that, while they not be identical, at first glance they would seem to be. Every decision was handled with care, and the changes that were made were so profound that I honestly considered making those changes to the book.

The ultimate hope was to create a script, and later a film, that would spark conversations, build empathy, and give voices to those who are so often silenced. Even more so, we hoped to capture a moment so that years from now, when people look back and watch “The Hate U Give,” it will give them an understanding of where
we were at that time as a society and that ultimately, it will inspire them to create an even better future.

“The Hate U Give” novelist Angie Thomas’ next book is “On the Come Up.”

More Film

  • Spirit Awards Showcase Oscar Players and

    Spirit Awards Showcase Oscar Players and Also-Rans, With Heavy Hitters on Deck

    Five of the last eight best feature winners at the annual Film Independent Spirit Awards have gone on to win best picture at the Oscars, including a four-year streak from 2013-2016. It was a steadily evolving status quo that led former Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences governor Bill Mechanic to question his organization’s [...]

  • Bo Burnham34th Film Independent Spirit Awards,

    Bo Burnham Wants 'Eighth Grade' Star Elsie Fisher to Direct Him

    Bo Burnham won his third award in three weeks for “Eighth Grade” at the Spirit Awards and said he wants the film’s 15-year-old Elsie Fisher to direct him. “I’d love to work with Elsie again,” Burnham said backstage after winning the Best First Screenplay trophy.  “She wants to direct so I’d love to switch roles [...]

  • Nicole Holofcener: 'Can You Ever Forgive

    Nicole Holofcener: 'Can You Ever Forgive Me?' Director Was Cheated Out of an Oscar Nomination

    “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” screenwriter Nicole Holofcener offered a blunt assessment of the lack of Academy Awards recognition for director Marielle Heller, and women directors everywhere. “I feel Marielle was cheated and I feel badly about that,” Holofcener said backstage after winning a Spirit Award for screenplay with Jeff Whitty. Holofcener was originally attached [...]

  • Stephan James as Fonny and Brian

    2019 Indie Spirit Awards Winners: Complete List

    The 2019 Independent Spirit Awards took place on a beach in Santa Monica, Calif., with Barry Jenkins’ “If Beale Street Could Talk” taking the top prize for best feature along with best director for Jenkins. Ethan Hawke and Glenn Close took the prizes for best male lead and best female lead, respectively. Bo Burnham took [...]

  • Oscars Oscar Academy Awards Placeholder

    Hated It! How We Learned to Stop Worrying and Gripe About the Oscars

    Watching the Academy Awards telecast, then grousing about it the next day, has become a hipster parlor game — it’s what the Complete Oscar Experience now is. The complaints are legion, and we all know what they are, because we’ve all made them. The show was too long. The host bombed. His or her opening [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content