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Film Review: ‘Forever My Girl’

Call this schmaltzy romantic drama Nicholas Sparks Lite, and you won't be far off the mark.

Director:
Bethany Ashton Wolf
With:
Alex Roe, Jessica Rothe, Abby Ryder Fortson, Peter Cambor, John Benjamin Hickey, Stephen T. Riggs, Gillian Vigman
Release Date:
Jan 19, 2018

Rated PG  1 hour 48 minutes

Forever My Girl” is a sweet but slight romantic drama that got lost on its way to the Hallmark Channel — or, more likely, was rebuffed by that channel’s gatekeepers for being, even by their standards, entirely too predictable — and wound up in theaters instead. It resembles nothing so much as a prosaic adaptation of a second-tier Nicholas Sparks novel, and doubtless will play best with audiences who think critics are much too harsh on movies that really are spawned by Sparks’ literary output.

As it turns out, writer-director Bethany Ashton Wolf based her script on a work by another novelist, Heidi McLaughlin, which may explain the lack of a third-act intrusion by the grim reaper. The prologue primes us to expect the worst of the protagonist, even before we actually meet him, by depicting what happened when he left his fiancée at the altar back in St. Augustine, La., to pursue his musical career. Flash forward eight years, and Liam Page (Alex Roe) has indeed achieved fame and fortune as a superstar country music singer-songwriter. And, yes, he has become every bit the spoiled and self-indulgent sybarite you might expect.

Ah, but appearances can be deceiving: He still treasures the antiquated flip-top cellphone that contains a forlorn message left years earlier by Josie (Jessica Rothe of “Happy Death Day”), the woman he left behind. Of course, he never has answered that message. In fact, he’s refrained from contacting any of the folks back home — including his estranged father, Brian (John Benjamin Hickey), the local pastor — while single-mindedly stoking his stardom, entertaining millions, and partying hearty. When he receives word of a childhood friend’s death in an auto mishap, however, Liam impulsively takes a return trip to St. Augustine.

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Once he’s there, it doesn’t take long for him to have an awkward encounter with Josie. (Specifically, she punches him in the gut after she spots him at the friend’s graveside service.) It takes only a bit longer for him to realize that Billy (Abby Ryder Fortson), Josie’s precocious daughter, is the child he never knew he fathered.

Much of “Forever My Girl” is devoted to Liam’s eager if not desperate attempts to bond with Billy. Much to his delight, and Josie’s discomfort, she readily accepts him as her dad — but not before busting his chops. (“I said I wanted to meet him,” Billy tells her disapproving mom, “but I never said I’d go easy on him.”) This budding relationship probably would be more engaging if Fortson weren’t encouraged so often to come across as a mouthy brat, and if the movie as a whole didn’t proceed at such a glacial pace.

Writer-director Wolf takes far too long to introduce any sort of impediment to the forging of a father-daughter connection and, inevitably, the formation of a nuclear family. Worse, when that impediment finally does arrive, in the form of a childhood trauma revealed with almost comical abruptness, the plot twist feels exactly like what is, an arbitrary contrivance introduced only to briefly delay happily-ever-aftering.

Wolf might have done better to expand upon some potentially interesting plot elements — such as the response of the other townspeople to Liam’s years-ago departure, and the musical career of Liam’s late mom — that are fleetingly referenced, then immediately forgotten.

The movie benefits from moments of mildly amusing comic relief, especially when the usually pampered Liam must cope with such complexities as signing a digital credit card receipt or ordering merchandise online. Roe and Rothe are blandly sincere as the romantic leads, but Peter Cambor gets a few good laughs as Liam’s repeatedly infuriated but ultimately supportive manager, a character who sporadically reminds the audience that, yes, there are real-world country music superstars. At one point, he gazes at his cellphone and exclaims: “Oh, crap! It’s Blake Shelton! I gotta take this!” And so he does.

Travis Tritt, Little Big Town, Josh Turner and, briefly, Miranda Lambert are among the country stars who can be heard on the soundtrack. And to give him fair credit, Roe is credible as a country singer when he performs some of the original tunes written or co-written by veteran tunesmith Brett Boyett. He may not be ready for the Grand Ole Opry, but he probably wouldn’t get booed off the stage on open mic night at Nashville’s Bluebird Café.

Film Review: 'Forever My Girl'

Reviewed online, Houston, Jan. 17, 2018. MPAA Rating: PG. Running time: 108 MIN.

Production: A Roadside Attractions release, presented in association with LD Entertainment, of an LD Entertainment production. Producers: Mickey Liddell, Pete Shilaimon, Jennifer Monroe. Executive producers: Alison Semenza King, Nicole Stojkovich, Zach Tann.

Crew: Director, writer: Bethany Ashton Wolf, based on the novel by Heidi McLaughlin. Camera (color): Duane Charles Manwiller. Editor: Priscilla Nedd-Friendly. Music: Brett Boyett.

With: Alex Roe, Jessica Rothe, Abby Ryder Fortson, Peter Cambor, John Benjamin Hickey, Stephen T. Riggs, Gillian Vigman

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