×

San Sebastian Festival Signs Gender Parity Pledge

Spain’s Assn. of Women Cineastes (CIMA) publishes gender statistics for the Spanish industry

SAN SEBASTIAN — Spain’s San Sebastian Festival signed a pledge on gender parity Sunday, following in the footsteps of other major festivals in Europe such as Cannes, Locarno, Sarajevo and Venice.

San Sebastian Festival director José Luis Rebordinos made the commitment in the presence of Spanish deputy prime minister Carmen Calvo; the minister of culture and sport, José Guirao; the president of the festival’s board of directors and mayor of San Sebastian, Eneko Goi; and the president of Spain’s Assn. of Women Cineastes (CIMA).

Speaking at a press conference, Rebordinos pointed out that in some executive areas, women’s presence is higher than men’s. The fest permanent staff is made up 82% of women; four of its seven board members are female, he noted.

In a recent statement, the fest announced that next year its film selection committee, currently five men and four women, will have a fifth female member, the festival’s head of communications, Ruth Pérez de Anucita.

With this pledge, the Spanish festival made the same commitment to gender analysis and transparency already taken on by other big European festivals, promising to gather statistics broken down by gender, regarding both the number of movie submissions and those chosen and programmed, in order to obtain real and reliable data on women representation and issue an annual update on progress made.

San Sebastian already publishes details of its selection committee and programmers.

Coinciding with the parity pledge, CIMA issued a 2017 report. Some stats:

*Women directed 12% of fiction features, produced 26% of them, and wrote 13%. of titles.

*Women accounted for a 24% of executive positions in the Spanish film industry, down from 29% in 2015 and 30% in 2016.

*Of 12 film categories, women had a higher presence in just two: Costume design and hair and makeup.

*Categories where women figure least are cinematographer, sound, soundtrack and F/X, all below 10%.

Per film types, the area with the most robust presence of men is animation, where women account for just 10%. In documentaries women stand at 16% and in fiction, the percentage last year was 27%, –again down on 2015 (29%), and 2016 (30%). In the light of the findings, women still have a long way to go to achieve parity.

Rebordinos said: “There have been people that congratulate us, because we have five women [out of 18 films at competitive section, five are directed by women]. It’s insane. It’s nothing to be proud of.”

“The simple fact of focusing in a critica fashion on the absence of professional women in certain jobs, the absence of interesting (roles) for the actresses, is already a positive indicator,” CIMA vice-president Virginia Yagüe told Variety, adding: “Equality used to be taken for granted in an opened-minded and enlightened sector like ours and this prevented us from developing a critical analysis which could have set out our deficit in gender matters.”

Carmen Calvo said  at the press conference to applause that “women just want to be able to compete with equal opportunities because we know we win.” She added: “Women just want to be in all the places that we justly deserve to be. Without us, there’s no democracy; with us, democracy gets better.”

More Film

  • Oscar OScars Placeholder

    Cinematographers Praise Academy Reversal: 'We Thank You for Your Show of Respect'

    Cinematographers who fought the decision to curtail four Oscar presentations have praised the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for reversing the exclusions. “We thank you for your show of respect for the hard-working members of the film community, whose dedication and exceptional talents deserve the public recognition this reversal now allows them to enjoy,” [...]

  • Peter Parker and Miles Morales in

    'Spider-Man: Into the Spiderverse' Colored Outside the Lines

    The well-worn superhero genre and one of its best-known icons are unlikely vehicles for creating a visually fresh animated feature. But Sony Pictures Animation’s work on the Oscar-nominated animated feature “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” shows throwing out the rule book and letting everyone play in the creative sandbox can pay off big. “I think we [...]

  • Denis Villeneuve

    Denis Villeneuve's 'Dune' Gets November 2020 Release Date

    Warner Bros. has scheduled Legendary’s science-fiction tentpole “Dune” for a Nov. 20, 2020, release in 3D and Imax. “Aquaman” star Jason Momoa is in negotiations to join the “Dune” reboot with Timothee Chalamet, Javier Bardem, Rebecca Ferguson, Stellan Skarsgard, Dave Bautista, Josh Brolin, Oscar Isaac, and Zendaya. Production is expected to launch in the spring [...]

  • James Bond Spectre

    Bond 25 Moved Back Two Months to April 2020

    James Bond will arrive two months later than planned as MGM moved back the release date on the untitled Bond 25 movie from Feb. 14 to April 8, 2020 — a Wednesday before the start of Easter weekend. It’s the second delay for Bond 25. MGM and Eon originally announced in 2017 that the film [...]

  • Fast and Furious 8

    'Fast and Furious 9' Release Date Pushed Back Six Weeks

    Universal Pictures has shifted “Fast and Furious 9” back six weeks from April 10 to May 22, 2020 — the start of the Memorial Day weekend. It’s the second backwards shift for the title. In 2017, Universal moved the film back a year from April 19, 2019, to April 10, 2020. Both dates fall on [...]

  • Alita Battle Angel

    'Alita' Inching Past 'Lego Movie 2' at Presidents Day Weekend Box Office

    James Cameron’s “Alita: Battle Angel” has a slight edge over “The Lego Movie 2” in a tight race for domestic box office supremacy during Presidents Day weekend. Both are aiming for about $27 million, early estimates showed on Friday. The two titles are the only current bright spots as overall moviegoing for 2019 trails far [...]

  • Ludwig Goransson Black Panther Composer

    Complete Guide to This Year's Oscar-Nominated Scores

    Unlike the song category, it’s impossible to predict the winner from this year’s quintet of original-score nominees. It’s almost anyone’s game. Swedish composer Ludwig Göransson spent a month in Africa recording unusual drums, flutes and vocals, then adding them to a massive London orchestra and choir to create a unique soundscape for the fictional land [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content