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Oscar-nominated title designer Richard Greenberg, who lent his artistry to classic films and franchises like “Superman,” “Alien,” and “The Matrix” died of appendicitis on June 16 his New York home. He was 71.

Greenberg received multiple award nominations for his creative work throughout his career, including a visual effects Oscar-nomination in 1988 for “Predator” and a visual effects BAFTA nomination for 1983’s “Zelig.” As a title designer, he contributed his talent to an array of films from the 1980s to 2010, including “Superman,” “Alien,” “The World According to Garp,” “Altered States,” “Dirty Dancing,” “The Untouchables,” the “Lethal Weapon” series, “Dracula,” “Independence Day,” “Seven,” and “The Matrix.”

Half of a sibling duo, Greenberg began designing titles with his brother Robert, with whom he founded R/Greenberg Associates, according to a report from Art of the Title. Greenberg handled the artistic side of their startup business, while his brother managed the business. It wasn’t until the early 1990s that Greenberg moved to Hollywood after he received his 1988 Oscar nomination.

While in Los Angeles, Greenberg founded a new design studio with Bruce Schluter, titled Greenberg/Schluter. Together, Greenberg and Schluter developed the main title art for Bram Stoker’s “Dracula,” “Independence Day,” the “Lethal Weapon” franchise, and “The Matrix.”

Some of Greenberg’s art can be seen now in the permanent collections of The Louvre museum in Paris and the Museum of Modern Art in New York. He received a bachelor’s degree in industrial design, as well as a master of fine arts degree in graphic design. Later, Greenberg went on to teach at the University of Illinois and the Institute of Design in Chicago.

He is survived by his three children, Jessica a New York Times journalist; Luke, co-founder of the BOND agency; and Morgan, chief product officer at the Whittle School.