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MoviePass Parent’s Stock Slides to Another Record Low

MoviePass parent Helios and Matheson Analytics’ stock has declined to its lowest closing price amid ongoing concerns on Wall Street about a cash shortage.

It slid 5 cents, or 12%, to close at 41 cents on Friday. The issue has now lost more than 80% of its value during the past three weeks and declined steadily since a May 8 filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that revealed it had $15.5 million in available cash at the end of April, plus $27.9 million on deposit with merchants while monthly expenses totaled $21.7 million.

The filing also said if adequate funding did not materialize, the company could be required to reduce the scope of its growth or otherwise alter its operations. An independent auditor also raised questions in April about MoviePass’ ability to continue operations.

The stock hit a 52-week high of $38.86 a share in October, two months after it lowered its monthly subscription fee from $50 to $9.95. The company is losing money because it pays movie theaters full price for the tickets its customers buy.

In an interview last week at the Cannes Film Festival, Helios and Matheson chief Ted Farnsworth told Variety that the subscription service was viable and had roughly $300 million available from an equity line of credit. The Helios chief was at the festival to premiere John Travolta’s “Gotti,” which MoviePass is releasing with Vertical Entertainment.

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