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John Carter, the first African-American to join the American Cinema Editors Society, died Aug. 13 at his home in White Plains, N.Y., according to a listing in the New York Times. He was 95.

His credits included “The Heartbreak Kid,” “Paper Lion,” and “Barbershop” and he received a BAFTA nomination for best film editing in 1971 for “Taking Off.”

Carter was born in Newark, N. J., on Sept. 22, 1922. He served in the U.S. Army as a staff sergeant trained at the New York Institute of Photography and took an apprenticeship with the Signal Corps Pictorial Center.

Carter was hired by CBS in 1956 and became the first African-American editor for network television in New York. He gained experience in CBS’ documentary unit before creating his own production company, John Carter Associates.

Other film credits incluced “Lean on Me,” “The Karate Kid Part III,” “Men of Honor,” “The Formula,” “Mikey and Nicky,” “Friday,” “Madea’s Family Reunion,” “A Thin Line Between Love and Hate,” “Shortcut to Happiness,” and “Boomerang.”

He also worked on the 1970 documentary “King: A Filmed Record … Montgomery to Memphis,” which documents Martin Luther King Jr.’s life. The film received an Oscar nomination for best documentary feature and was enshrined into the National Film Registry in 1999.

Survivors include his wife of 63 years, Carole; daughters Victoria and Carolyn; and son John. A memorial service will take place at 11 a.m. Saturday at Grace Episcopal Church in White Plains.