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Film News Roundup: Jennifer Lopez Romantic Comedy ‘Second Act’ Set for Holiday Season

In today’s film news roundup, Jennifer Lopez comedy “Second Act” gets a release date, Judith Ivey replaces Cathy Moriarty in “Through the Glass Darkly” and Rachel Brosnahan’s “Change in the Air” gets sold.

RELEASE DATE

STXfilms has given a holiday season release of Nov. 21 to the Jennifer Lopez romantic comedy “Second Act.”

“Second Act” is directed by Peter Segal and also stars Milo Ventimiglia, Leah Remini, Vanessa Hudgens and Treat Williams. Lopez plays a big-box store employee who reinvents her life and her lifestyle to prove to Madison Avenue that street smarts are as valuable as a college degree.

“Second Act” was developed by STX with Lopez from an idea conceived by Elaine Goldsmith-Thomas and Justin Zackham. The film is written and produced by Elaine Goldsmith-Thomas and Justin Zackham, with Jennifer Lopez and Benny Medina also serving as producers.

It’s the fourth title to land on the date after MGM’s “Creed 2,” Disney’s “Wreck-It Ralph 2: Ralph Breaks the Internet” and Universal’s untitled Robert Zemeckis project.

MORIARTY REPLACED

Judith Ivey has joined the cast of the psychological thriller “Through the Glass Darkly” in the role of a small-town matriarch, filling the role after Cathy Moriarty became ill, Variety has learned exclusively.

“Judith is a consummate actor and a joy to work with. She jumped right into the film and we couldn’t be happier,” said director Lauren Fash.

“Through the Glass Darkly” stars Robyn Lively, Shanola Hampton and Michael Trucco. Lively plays a 43-year-old woman recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, living in small-town Georgia with her wife. When the granddaughter of the town matriarch goes missing, paranoia shakes the core of this sleepy community, reviving old ghosts and long-buried secrets.

Susan Graham of However Productions is producing along with Autumn Bailey-Ford, of Autumn Bailey Entertainment, and Carmella Casinelli, of Bon Aire Productions. The script was featured in the Sundance/Women in Film financing intensive in 2017 and is executive produced by Stacey Davis and Jim Rine. Ivey is repped by Abrams Artists Agency.

BERLIN DEAL

Screen Media has acquired worldwide rights to Dianne Dreyer’s “Change in the Air,” starring Mary Beth Hurt, Aidan Quinn, Rachel Brosnahan, Macy Gray, M. Emmet Walsh, Seth Gilliam and Olympia Dukakis.

The film will be released in theaters in 2018. It marks the directorial debut of Dreyer, a script supervisor on over 50 titles including “The English Patient,” “Air Force One,” “You’ve Got Mail,” “Unbreakable,” “Glengarry Glen Ross” and “Cold Mountain.”

Screen Media is in early discussions with foreign buyers at Berlin after finalizing the deal. Benjamin Cox’s Red Square Pictures produced the film in association with M.Y.R.A. Entertainment, Fish Hook Media, and Home Plate Pictures.

Brosnahan portrays a beguiling woman who moves into a quiet neighborhood, bringing people face to face with their secrets and, ultimately, themselves.

The deal was negotiated by Seth Needle at Screen Media, and by Benjamin Cox of Red Square Pictures on behalf of the filmmakers.

 

 

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