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Jamie Lee Curtis on the Power of ‘Halloween’s’ #MeToo Context: It Relieves ‘A Little Bit of That Trauma’

In the months leading up to Friday’s release of “Halloween,” it’s become clear that the film is meant as more than just another installment in the legendary horror franchise. At Wednesday’s L.A. premiere at the TCL Chinese Theater in Hollywood, Jamie Lee Curtis hammered that point home.

“The movie was written in January 2017 and it was a movie about trauma,” Curtis said. “We never make movies about what happens after the violence. We make movies about violence, we glorify it, but we never ask what happens [after].”

She continued, “And in the asking what happens and seeing what generational trauma looks like, all of a sudden on Oct. 10, 2017, that first article came out in the New Yorker. All of a sudden, women started talking about stories of violence perpetrated against them, sexual violence perpetrated against them, oppression perpetrated against them by powerful men in powerful positions who stole their innocence.”

“And now all of a sudden, this idea of women — you see, a bunch of those perpetrators are in prison today. And the women who helped put them there are relieved, a little bit, of that trauma. And that’s what our movie is going to bring to people on Friday.”

Halloween” picks up 40 years after the 1978 events of the original “Halloween,” for a final confrontation between Laurie Strode and Michael Myers. The scarred Strode has spent that time preparing for what she views as his inevitable return, outfitting her cabin in the woods with traps and teaching her only daughter self-defense.

Asked whether she ever thought she’d see the powerful men brought down, Curtis replied, “‘Course not. But it’s happened throughout history. There are always moments of transformative change and the only way something changes is, ‘Unless something changes…’ and that’s how this works.”

Co-screenwriters Danny McBride and David Gordon Green — who also directed the film — concurred with Curtis’ stance.

“When we were writing, it was kind of the wave before that,” Green said of the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements. “We started production in mid-January. It was very much a part of the conversation of the production process more so than the writing. But once you cast these strong female voices and we’re looking at a reflection of culture in this time period, it’s hard not to acknowledge that.”

“Halloween” hits theaters Oct. 19.

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