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Chris Evans Talks ‘Infinity War,’ Broadway and His Future With Captain America

Is Captain America ready to hang up his shield? Chris Evans has said so in the past, and his contract with Marvel is up after “Avengers 4,” the 2019 follow-up to the imminent “Avengers: Infinity War.”

But in a recent interview with Variety, the actor hinted that he might be open to sticking with the Avengers for a bit longer.

Asked if “Avengers 4” will mark his last outing in uniform, he answered, “Tough to say.” Addressing the subject on Stagecraft, Variety‘s theater podcast, Evans discussed his current Broadway run in “Lobby Hero,” his theater-kid roots and, of course, whether there’s a future for him in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. “Part of you almost kind of thinks: Well, if we end on the right note… and I think it really kind of does. The scripts they have are really beautiful and really well written.”

“They do such a good job,” he continued about Marvel and the upcoming “Avengers” films. “It’s really sweet and lovely and just special, and everyone really has a nice tight plot and story arc. Part of you almost doesn’t want to mess that up. … I guess it depends. It’s hard to know where your head’s gonna be at in a few years.”

But if you ask Evans if he’ll want to be in a Broadway show after “Lobby Hero,” his answer is far more certain. “Theater is the thing that I didn’t know that I needed,” he declared, adding, “As soon as this is over I will be on the hunt for the next play.”

He thinks of himself as a theater kid, he said, appearing in everything from “The Music Man” to “Into the Woods” to “West Side Story” to “The Pirates of Penzance.” Even so, he hadn’t been onstage since he was 18, and he admitted to some nerves coming into “Lobby Hero,” the Kenneth Lonergan play in which he stars with Michael Cera, Brian Tyree Henry and Bel Powley, playing through May 13.

“It was an intimindating thing to try and do, just because I know [Broadway is] a very tight-knit community, and I think you really have to earn your stripes to do it at this level, and I have not,” he admitted. “And so you feel a little scared that you won’t be accepted, and concerned that you’re maybe taking a job from someone who’s worked really hard to be up on that stage. You don’t want to feel like you’re just leaning on your film credits and cutting the line or something.”

He continued, “So at once you feel like you’re a bit of an impostor but you also feel like you’re home.” Despite his jitters, reception has been warm from critics, audiences and the Broadway community alike: “Luckily it’s  been really nice, and everyone has  been very welcoming.”

On Stagecraft, Evans also addresses whether he wants to direct another film, gives a firm answer on whether he’ll ever star in a Broadway musical and explains the difficulties of spit management onstage.

Download and subscribe to Stagecraft on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and SoundCloud.

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