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‘Call Me by Your Name,’ ‘Phantom Thread’ Rule International Cinephile Society Awards

Two very different love stories split the top prizes at the awards, voted on by film critics, academics and industry pros worldwide.

Perhaps because it broke so late in the season, Paul Thomas Anderson’s surprise six-time Oscar nominee “Phantom Thread” under-performed a bit on the critics’ award circuit, bagging fewer prizes than its adoring critical reception might suggest. But it made up for lost time in the International Cinephile Society honors, voted on by over 100 critics, academics and industry professionals worldwide: Luca Guadagnino’s “Call Me By Your Name” won best picture, but Anderson’s film ran it close and ultimately took five awards, the most of any film, including best director.

Indeed, the two films’ tallies were almost in perfect balance. While Guadagnino’s gay coming-of-age romance also took best adapted screenplay and both male acting prizes for Timothée Chamalet and Michael Stuhlbarg, Anderson’s more eccentric love story won best original screenplay and the female acting categories for Vicky Krieps (finally getting some attention this season) and Lesley Manville. Only an additional best score prize for Jonny Greenwood put “Phantom Thread” a nose ahead in the final count.

While that pair of films consumed most of the oxygen, two other titles earned multiple honors: French AIDS activist drama “BPM (Beats Per Minute)” won best best ensemble and best foreign language film, while “Blade Runner 2049” was honored for its dazzling cinematography and production design.

Meanwhile, a special 15th anniversary prize was given to Leos Carox’s surreal 2012 odyssey “Holy Motors,” voted the best winner of the ICS’s first 15 years.

Full list of winners and nominees below:

Best Picture: “Call Me By Your Name

“Phantom Thread” (runner-up)
“Blade Runner 2049”
“BPM (Beats Per Minute)”
“Good Time”
“Lady Bird”
“The Lost City of Z”
“Nocturama”
“On the Beach at Night Alone”
“Personal Shopper”
“A Quiet Passion”

Best Director: Paul Thomas Anderson, “Phantom Thread”

Luca Guadagnino, “Call Me By Your Name” (runner-up)
Bertrand Bonello, “Nocturama”
Greta Gerwig, “Lady Bird”
James Gray, “The Lost City of Z”
Denis Villeneuve, “Blade Runner 2049”

Best Foreign Language Film: “BPM (Beats Per Minute)”

“On the Beach at Night Alone” (runner-up)
“The Death of Louis XIV”
“Faces Places”
“Nocturama”
“The Ornithologist”
“Raw”
“Sieranevada”
“Staying Vertical”
“The Woman Who Left”

Best Actor: Timothée Chalamet, “Call Me by Your Name”

Robert Pattinson, “Good Time” (runner-up)
Daniel Day-Lewis,” Phantom Thread”
Jean-Pierre Léaud, “The Death of Louis XIV”
Nahuel Pérez Biscayart, “BPM (Beats Per Minute)”

Best Actress: Vicky Krieps, “Phantom Thread”

Kim Min-hee, “On the Beach at Night Alone” (runner-up)
Cynthia Nixon, “A Quiet Passion”
Saoirse Ronan, “Lady Bird”
Kristen Stewart, “Personal Shopper”
Daniela Vega, “A Fantastic Woman”

Best Supporting Actor: Michael Stuhlbarg, “Call Me By Your Name”

Arnaud Valois, “BPM (Beats Per Minute)” (runner-up)
John Lloyd Cruz, “The Woman Who Left”
Willem Dafoe, “The Florida Project”
Armie Hammer, “Call Me By Your Name”
Barry Keoghan, “The Killing of a Sacred Deer”

Best Supporting Actress: Lesley Manville, “Phantom Thread”

Laurie Metcalf, “Lady Bird” (runner-up)
Juliette Binoche, “Slack Bay”
Amira Casar, “Call Me By Your Name”
Sienna Miller, “The Lost City of Z”

Best Original Screenplay:
Paul Thomas Anderson, “Phantom Thread”

Jordan Peele, “Get Out” (runner-up)
Greta Gerwig, “Lady Bird”
Olivier Assayas, “Personal Shopper”
Terence Davies, “A Quiet Passion”

Best Adapted Screenplay:
James Ivory, “Call Me By Your Name”

James Gray, “The Lost City of Z” (runner-up)
Thierry Lounas and Albert Serra, “The Death of Louis XIV”
Michael Almereyda, “Marjorie Prime”
Lav Diaz, “The Woman Who Left”

Best Cinematography: Roger Deakins, “Blade Runner 2049”

Darius Khondji, “The Lost City of Z” (runner-up)
Sayombhu Mukdeeprom, “Call Me By Your Name”
Léo Hinstin, “Nocturama”
Edward Lachman, “Wonderstruck”

Best Editing: Ronald Bronstein and Benny Safdie, “Good Time”

David Lowery, “A Ghost Story” (runner-up)
Lee Smith, “Dunkirk”
Fabrice Rouaud, “Nocturama”
Marion Monnier, “Personal Shopper”

Best Production Design: Dennis Gassner, “Blade Runner 2049”

Mark Tildesley, “Phantom Thread” (runner-up)
Samuel Deshors, “Call Me By Your Name”
Merijn Sep, “A Quiet Passion”
Mark Friedberg, “Wonderstruck”

Best Original Score:
Jonny Greenwood, “Phantom Thread”

Oneohtrix Point Never, “Good Time” (runner-up)
Sufjan Stevens, “Call Me By Your Name”
Christopher Spelman, “The Lost City of Z”
Carter Burwell, “Wonderstruck”

Best Ensemble: “BPM (Beats Per Minute)”

“Lady Bird” (runner-up)
“Call Me by Your Name”
“Nocturama”
“Sieranevada”

Best Animated Film: “The Girl Without Hands”

“Coco” (runner-up)
“The Breadwinner”
“Loving Vincent”
“My Entire High School Sinking Into the Sea”

Best Documentary: (tie) “Ex Libris: The New York Public Library” and “Faces Places”

“Chavela”
“Dawson City: Frozen Time”
“Wormwood”

Best Picture Not Released in 2017

“A Ciambra”
“Bangkok Nites”
“Braguino”
“Claire’s Camera”
“Closeness”
“The Day After”
“Giant”
“Jeannette: The Childhood of Joan of Arc”
“Lean on Pete”
“Let the Sun Shine In”
“Lover for a Day”
“Mektoub, My Love: Canto Uno”
“On Body and Soul”
“The Rider”
“Sicilian Ghost Story”
“24 Frames”
“Western”
“The Wild Boys”
“You Were Never Really Here”
“Zama”

15th Anniversary Award: “Holy Motors”

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