×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Christophe Honoré on ‘Sorry Angel’: ‘In France We’re Blessed as Filmmakers’

One of French novelist-turned-director Christophe Honoré’s most personal films, “Sorry Angel” world premiered on Thursday in competition at Cannes. Sold by MK2, “Sorry Angel” stars French actors Pierre Deladonchamps as a 30-something jaded, HIV-positive novelist who comes across an enthusiastic aspiring writer, Arthur (Vincent Lacoste) in his early 20s. “Sorry Angel” marks the director’s comeback to Cannes’s competition 11 years after “Love Songs.” He’s working on “Les Idoles,” a new play paying tribute to several artists who died of AIDS. It will kick off in January at Paris’ Odéon theater.

“Sorry Angel” follows a romance between two men, one of which has AIDS, in the ’90s. Yet, your film is not a full-on AIDS drama like Robin Campillo’s “BPM.” How would you describe it?

I wanted to explore my memories of being in my 20s in the ’90s. AIDS was part of our lives, so many people around me died, and at the time, AIDS and the fear of death was looming over love and sex relationships.

Do you think it’s the role of a filmmaker to address social or political issues?

I think it’s pretentious to proclaim oneself a militant director. Our craft is about working with the imaginary and steering away from stereotypes. It’s important to be socially aware, but not sociological in our approach to making films.

Do you think the number of gay-themed films is continuing to increase, especially at festivals?

I think programmers are becoming way less self-conscious because they’ve understood that the gender of characters has little to do with the emotions one can feel watching them. “Happy Together” and “Blue Is the Warmest Color” are good examples.

There are several sex scenes in the film. How did you tackle them?

I tried to not show too much, but it was unavoidable because sensuality plays a big part in these characters’ lives. But I didn’t show them having orgasm, and didn’t ask them to simulate it.

Was it difficult to finance this film because of its subject?

I can’t complain because in France we’re blessed as filmmakers. If I lived in Germany or Italy I would have directed two or three films in 15 years, and not the 10 movies I made in France.

Yet, you made it with a budget of under €3 million. How did that work out?

It was a labor of love, we worked with back-ends. And here we are premiering the film in competition at Cannes! This film is like a pumpkin that turned into a carriage.

More Film

  • Aquaman 2018

    'Aquaman' Reviews: What the Critics Are Saying

    Reviews of DC’s “Aquaman” vary between feelings of surprise and disappointment. Some critics are applauding director James Wan’s strong re-imagining of a previously stale character, while others are harping on DC’s inability to stack up against rival Marvel — but most are just relieved the film isn’t an all-out flop. There are virtually no qualms about [...]

  • Black Panther

    'Black Panther' Named Top Movie of 2018 by African American Film Critics Assn.

    Ryan Coogler’s “Black Panther” has won three awards from members of the African American Film Critics Association, taking the trophies for best film, director, and song for “All the Stars.” The AAFCA made the announcement Tuesday and will present the awards in ceremonies on Feb. 6 at the Taglyan Complex in Los Angeles. “Selecting Disney’s [...]

  • IFFAM: Shekhar Kapur Plans Raft of

    IFFAM: Shekhar Kapur Plans New 'Elisabeth' Film (EXCLUSIVE)

    Shekhar Kapur, best known outside India for “Elizabeth,” his 1998 biopic about the 16th Century British queen, is readying a new “Elisabeth” film. Based on a musical about one of the most famous members of the Austrian royal family, the film is to be shot in German. Together with Michael Kunze and Sylvester Levay, Kapur [...]

  • Vasan Bala Sets ‘Till The Last

    Vasan Bala Takes ‘Last Breath’ Back to Ronnie Screwvala's RSVP (EXCLUSIVE)

    Vasan Bala, director of the International Film Festival & Awards Macao’s Indian competition title “The Man Who Feels No Pain” (aka “Mard Ko Dard Nahin Hota”), will next direct “Till The Last Breath” (“Marte Dum Tak”). As with “No Pain,” former Disney India managing director Ronnie Screwvala will produce through his RSVP production outfit. “No [...]

  • IFFAM: Nicolas Cage Talks Asian Cinema,

    IFFAM: Nicolas Cage Talks Asian Cinema, Chinese Money

    Nicolas Cage, the Oscar-winning actor and International Film Festival & Awards Macao talent ambassador, reckons he is no stranger to the Asian brand of cinema. He has worked with the likes of John Woo (“Face/Off”,) the Pang Brothers (“Bangkok Dangerous” remake) and Sion Sono on upcoming English-language film “Prisoners of the Ghostland.” Addressing a press [...]

  • Best Films of 2018 Variety

    The Best Films of 2018

    Variety chief film critics — and cinema omnivores — Owen Gleiberman and Peter Debruge spend the year devouring everything from superhero movies to subtitled festival gems, which leaves a wealth of exceptional films to savor at year’s end. While “A Star Is Born” scored high with both critics, and “Eighth Grade” and “The Rider” each [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content