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Manson Family Drama ‘Charlie Says’ Picked Up by IFC Films for U.S. (EXCLUSIVE)

IFC Films has acquired U.S. rights to “Charlie Says,” the Manson Family drama that recently world premiered at the Venice Film Festival. The movie is directed by “American Psycho” helmer Mary Harron and stars Matt Smith (“The Crown,” “Doctor Who”) as the infamous killer Charles Manson.

In a deal believed to be in the seven figures, IFC beat out bidders such as A24, Momentum and RLJ Entertainment.

Written by Guinevere Turner and based on Ed Sanders’ 1971 bestselling book “The Family,” “Charlie Says” focuses on the three young women who fell under Manson’s spell and carried out a series of savage murders on his orders in 1969, including that of Sharon Tate, Roman Polanski’s pregnant wife. The women were given death sentences, later changed to life in prison. “Charlie Says” depicts their psychological rehabilitation as they faced the reality of their crimes.

The movie is headlined by Smith, Suki Waterhouse, Hannah Murray, Sosie Bacon, Marianne Rendon, and Merritt Wever. It premiered earlier this month in Venice’s Horizons section. IFC Films is planning for a 2019 theatrical release. The deal for the film was negotiated by Arianna Bocco, EVP of acquisitions and production at IFC Films and UTA Independent Film Group on behalf of the filmmaker.

“Charlie Says” was produced by Epic Level Entertainment and Roxwell Films.

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The movie was produced by Dana Guerin, Cindi Rice, John Frank Rosenblum and Jeremy Rosen. David Hillary, Ed Sanders and Michael Guerin executive produced.

Harron is a critically acclaimed Canadian director whose best-known credits include “I Shot Andy Warhol,” “American Psycho” and the Netflix miniseries “Alias Grace.”

IFC Films/Sundance Selects’ recent acquisitions include Paolo Sorrentino’s “Loro,” about the former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, and Olivier Assayas’ bittersweet French comedy “Non-Fiction,” which are both playing at Toronto.

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