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StoryBoard Media to Release ‘Too Late to Die Young’ in Chile (EXCLUSIVE)

Director Dominga Sotomayor spearheading the building of new CCC film center in Santiago

StoryBoard Media to release ‘Too Late
CINESTACIóN

SANTIAGO DE CHILE  — “Too Late to Die Young” (“Tarde Para Morir Joven”), Dominga Sotomayor’s coming-of-age drama, has been picked up by Santiago-based producer-distributor StoryBoard Media, which aims to release the drama in Chile by May next year.

Likened by some to “Call Me Your Name” for its evocative tale, “Too Late to Die Young” snagged Sotomayor a Best Director Leopard at Switzerland’s Locarno Film Festival, the first female director to receive this coveted prize. Paris-based Stray Dogs secured world sales rights to “Too Late to Die Young” (except for Chile, Brazil, Argentina, and Benelux) in the run-up to Locarno.

The film had its Chilean premiere at the 14th Santiago Intl. Film Festival (Sanfic, Aug. 19-26), where it played to sold-out screenings.

StoryBoard plans to release “Too Late…” in up to 35 commercial and indie screens across Chile, said StoryBoard Media producer and Sanfic industry director, Gabriela Sandoval.

Well aware that Chilean auds rarely turn up for local auteur films, despite international accolades, StoryBoard Media is organizing a full-blown campaign that includes premieres and Q & As, and are confident that the film’s popular cast and Sotomayor’s international recognition will lure an audience, both indie and mainstream.

Chile is also vastly under-screened, with just a total of 438 screens, mostly dominated by Hollywood fare. Auteur films last a week or two at most, especially, if they play poorly. The best foreign-language Oscar win for Sebastian Lelio’s “A Fantastic Woman,” made it an exception, where it was re-released after its award in response to growing demand, said StoryBoard Media producer-partner and Sanfic artistic director, Carlos Nunez.

In a bid to partly address these issues, Sotomayor has teamed up with other filmmakers to build an ambitious new film center dubbed Centro de Cine y Creacion (CCC). Funded by both public and private investors, the $1.5 million restoration of a large house built in 1913 will begin in September.

Located in the heart of Santiago, the non-profit film center is slated to open next year with a 30-seat screening room in its first phase and a 100-seat theatre in its second phase of construction.

CCC will include offices, a terrace with an open-air cinema and offer workshops, among sundry activities. “We are planning to form part of a Latin American network of art house cinemas,” she said.

“It’s going to be a film center run by filmmakers,” said Sotomayor whose founding partners include editor Catalina Marin, architect Rafaela Behrens and director-actress Manuela Martelli.

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