×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

John Krasinski and Rosamond Pike on Vulnerability and Decompressing After Tense Scenes

John Krasinski and Rosamund Pike sat down for a conversation for Variety’s Actors on Actors. For more, click here

In “Gone Girl,” Rosamund Pike proved she could put herself through anything. The British actress, a well-loved supporting player in “Pride & Prejudice” and “An Education,” took the lead and scored her first Oscar nomination. Four years later, Pike is courting awards attention again with “A Private War,” a film about the life of the late Marie Colvin, a war correspondent whose loss of an eye (due to a rocket-launched grenade in Sri Lanka) failed to contain her drive to document the truth.

John Krasinski has enjoyed a recent career renaissance, pivoting from the sweet paper salesman he played on “The Office” to the thinking movie fan’s hunk in 2018, a star whose charisma and talent is bolstered by his obvious love for family. He stars opposite his wife, Emily Blunt, in his directorial effort “A Quiet Place.”

John Krasinski: How did “A Private War” come to you? Was it something that you always wanted to do, to play some sort of character with that level of intensity and toughness?

Rosamund Pike: I think I’m very drawn to people who show tremendous courage. Probably because it’s a quality I feel I lack. When you’re trying to convey somebody’s life, who’s been lost very recently and who people love very fiercely and protectively, you want to feel that you’re going to get at something that does feel truthful.

Krasinski: How was that, trying to get to know her through the people who knew her?

Pike: I think I realized so quickly how painful it was to people who knew her. I rang [director] Matt [Heineman] in the middle of the night, and I said, “I don’t know if we can do this.” And the next morning, this taxi arrived at my door in London, and there was nobody in it, just this bag. One of her friends had sent me a sweater and a jacket that had belonged to Marie. The message was “Keep going.”

Krasinski: She doesn’t seem like someone who would want a movie about her, do you think?

Pike: As a journalist, I think she’s really someone who doesn’t want to be at the center of a story. It’s not your grief to feel, and yet, boy, do you feel it.

Krasinski: What is it like working with an eye patch for an entire movie?

Pike: People ask me sort of  “Could you actually see through it?” I said no. What would be the point of that? That would kind of defeat everything. I think the eye patch is so core to who Marie was. You are literally blindsided. She took that disability and went into conflict zones. We do seek those things that change the way you negotiate the world, which you must’ve felt doing “A Quiet Place,” with not being able to speak.

Krasinski: Absolutely. There was definitely a huge feeling of fear in a good way. Are words something that not only you need as an actor, but you need as a director and editor, to sort of meter your movie? But the cool thing about not being able to speak in a movie, other than with sign language, is that I left the door open to allow organic moments to happen. I knew that the scenes would be pretty interesting, but I wasn’t prepared for them to be more beautiful than anything I could’ve written. I remember day three, watching Emily do a scene with these kids. Emily was great in the scene, but these kids were so unbelievable that when you took away their ability to speak, they were emoting some of the purest performances I had seen.

Pike: Those children trusted you; Emily obviously trusts you.

Krasinski: Well it’s all high-wire acting. If you don’t trust that person, there’s a much bigger chance of falling.

Pike: Or you’re making yourself super vulnerable, and you’ve got to know that that is in hands that are going to hold you.

Krasinski: People ask Emily all the time: “Did you live with that movie? Did you live with that character?” We are not those people. What do you do when you’re doing “A Private War”? Do you stay in that turmoil? Or do you pop in and out?

Pike: I think I can sort of go home and get on the floor and start playing with Legos.

Krasinski: And that’s not even with your kids, just yourself.

Watch the full interview below:

More Film

  • Andy Vajna Dead: 'Rambo' Producer and

    Andy Vajna, 'Rambo' Producer, Dies at 74

    Andy Vajna, executive producer of several “Rambo” films as well as “Total Recall” and several “Terminator” movies, has died at 74. The Hungarian National Film Fund confirmed his death, calling him a “dominant figure in the Hungarian and international film industry” who was responsible for the development of the fund. With partner Mario Kassar, Vajna [...]

  • Glass trailer

    Box Office: 'Glass' Dominates MLK Weekend With $47 Million

    M. Night Shyamalan’s “Glass” topped box office charts during the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday, collecting $40 million over the weekend for a four-day sum of $47 million. If estimates hold, “Glass” will come in behind “American Sniper” ($107 million) and “Ride Along” ($48 million) as the third-best showing for both January and MLK holiday [...]

  • FICG Names Estrella Araiza As New

    Estrella Araiza To Head Up Guadalajara Intl Film Festival

    The Guadalajara Intl. Film Festival (FICG) has announced that Estrella Araiza, until now the festival’s head of industry and markets and director of the Guadalajara IntL. Film Festival in Los Angeles, has been promoted to the position of general director of the prominent Mexican festival. She replaces Ivan Trujillo, appointed director of TV UNAM. Araiza [...]

  • 'St. Bernard Syndicate' Review: A Quietly

    Film Review: 'St. Bernard Syndicate'

    John C. Reilly and Steve Coogan may have received major award nominations this season for their fine work in “Stan & Ollie,” but there’s arguably a superior Laurel & Hardy tribute act to be found in the droll Danish comedy “St. Bernard Syndicate.” As a pair of bumbling losers who turn an already dubious business [...]

  • With PGA win, 'Green Book' is

    Oscars: With PGA Victory, 'Green Book' Becomes Best Picture Frontrunner

    Save for a pair of recent back-to-back discrepancies in “The Big Short” and “La La Land,” the Producers Guild’s Darryl F. Zanuck Award for Theatrical Motion Pictures has been a fairly reliable barometer for the annual Oscar season outcome. At least, ever since both the PGA and film Academy expanded their top categories, sharing the [...]

  • Peter Farrelly30th Annual Producers Guild Awards,

    PGA Awards: 'Green Book' Wins Top Feature Film Award

    “Green Book” has won the Producers Guild’s Darryl F. Zanuck Award as the top feature film of 2018. The 1960s drama-comedy topped “BlacKkKlansman,” “Black Panther” “Bohemian Rhapsody,” “Crazy Rich Asians,” “The Favourite,”  “A Quiet Place,” “Roma,” “A Star Is Born” and “Vice. “When you make ‘Dumb and Dumber’ you never expect to get an award,” [...]

  • Netflix HQ LA

    Andy Gruenberg, Veteran Film Executive, Dies at 68

    Veteran film executive Andy Gruenberg, who most recently oversaw theatrical distribution at Netflix, died suddenly on Friday. He was 68. Gruenberg worked on classic films like “Ghostbusters,” “Karate Kid” and “Silverado” while at Columbia Pictures in the 80s and 90s. He then moved to MGM where he served as exec VP of distribution. There he [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content