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‘Get Out’ Producer Jason Blum Picks Up Two Tony Nominations

“Get Out” producer Jason Blum is having a busy week.

He’s been in New York to present his new horror anthology series “Into the Dark” at Hulu’s Upfront presentation. But that’s not the only thing worth celebrating in the Blum household. The horror movie maestro is now a Tony Award-nominated producer.

Blum has credits on both “The Iceman Cometh” and “Three Tall Women.” His involvement in both shows is somewhat below-the-radar. Scott Rudin, the Oscar-winning producer of “No Country for Old Men,” was the lead creative producer on the two plays. “The Iceman Cometh” and “Three Tall Women” both boast starry casts, with Denzel Washington headlining the former and Glenda Jackson and Laurie Metcalf anchoring the latter. “The Iceman Cometh” earned eight nominations and “Three Tall Women” nabbed six nominations.

Blum declined to comment for this piece. Although best known as a producer of low-cost scary movies such as “The Purge” and “Insidious,” Blum got his start in theater. While working at a real estate company, he was also involved with Malaparte, a New York-based non-profit theater company that included Josh Hamilton, Ethan Hawke, and Calista Flockhart among its members. Blum was a producing director, who also reportedly hawked Malaparte shows on Times Square. He was also a producer on 2015’s “Finding Neverland,” a musical adaptation of the Johnny Depp film that never quite achieved lift-off with Tony voters.

As for “Into the Dark,” the show will include a standalone episodes each month. Every installment will be pegged to a holiday, putting some kind of horrific twist on the festivities. The first chapter, “The Body,” debuts on Oct. 5 and will center on a hitman navigating Hollywood on Halloween.

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