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How Hollywood, Award Shows Helped Expand Time’s Up Into a Worldwide Cause

In the weeks since a letter published Jan. 1 in the New York Times announced the inception of Time’s Up and the subsequent blackout at the Golden Globes, the landscape of not just the film industry, but the country as a whole has changed irrecoverably. However, while awards show season — amplified by the platform of the red carpet — has provided a powerful backdrop to Time’s Up, don’t expect the curtain to come down on the movement with the close of the Academy Awards on March 4.

“Time’s Up is not an awards show awareness campaign; we are an action campaign,” says a representative, who spoke on the condition of anonymity. “Most of the work we do is done behind closed doors.” That work “spans the entertainment industry in every way — corporate/HR policy, representation in storytelling, creating more opportunity for women of color across the board, creating more awareness of the many jobs available behind the camera, a call for more representation at companies at the highest level and much more.”

While signatories of the Jan.1 letter included more than 300 leading women in Hollywood, the campaign aims to help women across all industries. “Outside of our industry, we’ve received interest from almost every industry imaginable to create their own versions of TIme’s Up and we are actively working to figure out the best way to move that forward,” says the rep.

Time’s Up has drawn not just national, but global attention, with the Globes blackout extended across the pond to the BAFTAs on Feb. 18. “Inspired by the Time’s Up movement in the U.S., we are working to continue the incredible movement this side of the Atlantic,” wrote a “collective of U.K.-based female film and television industry leaders” in a letter calling on attendees to participate.

“We’ve received interest from many other countries, from the U.K. to Kenya and South Korea,” says the rep. “The interest shows us just how necessary the work is and we are excited and encouraged by the potential for change.”

Men will form part of the bedrock of that change. They are “a very important part of the work we’re doing and you can expect to see them brought into the conversation as we move our actions forward. Already, we have had a Times Up Men meeting and expect more to follow. You can expect to hear more about the fruits of our labor in the coming months.”

Jan. 1
Time’s Up is announced in the New York Times alongside a letter from 300 executives, actresses and creatives in response to the farmworker women’s letter to Hollywood.

Jan. 4
America Ferrera and National Farmworker Women’s Alliance president Monica Ramirez appear on NBC’s “Today” show to discuss the coalition’s action plan.

Jan. 7
Men and women, eight of whom brought activists as their date, wear black and Time’s Up pins to the Golden Globes. While presenting the director award alongside Ron Howard, Natalie Portman called out the “all-male” nominees, while Cecil B. De Mille award winner Oprah Winfrey brought the house down with a rousing and inspiring nine-minute speech saluting Time’s Up.

Jan. 9
Greta Gerwig tells the New York Times she regrets working with Woody Allen and will not work for him again. Mira Sorvino, who won an Oscar for Allen’s 1995 film “Mighty Aphrodite,” writes an open letter apologizing to Dylan Farrow.

Jan. 13
Mark Wahlberg announces plans to donate the $1.5 million salary he earned reshooting scenes from “All the Money in the World” to the Time’s Up Legal Defense Fund in co-star Michelle Williams’ name.

Jan. 17
Ellen Pompeo, “TV’s $20 million woman,” divulges details of her behind-the-scenes fight to get paid what she deserved in order to “to set an example for others as we women in Hollywood seize a new moment of empowerment and opportunity.”

Jan. 20
At women’s marches across the country, women speak out in support of Time’s Up including Scarlett Johansson and Eva Longoria in Los Angeles and Jane Fonda at Sundance.

Jan. 21
Ashley Judd shares her experiences of sexual abuse and inequality at the Univision Communications Behind the Camera: Where Diversity Begins panel at the Sundance Film Festival.

Jan. 25
Casey Affleck withdraws from presenting the lead actress award at the Oscars.

Jan. 30
Hundreds of Democrats wear black and Time’s Up pins at the State of the Union.

Jan. 28
Grammy Award attendees wear Time’s Up pins and white roses as a symbol of “hope, peace, sympathy and resistance.” “We come in peace but we mean business,” says Janelle Monae in a rousing tribute to Time’s Up while introducing Kesha’s powerhouse performance of “Praying.”

Feb. 5
Female music executives from Universal, Warner and Sony issue a letter remonstrating with the Recording Academy leadership following Grammy president Neil Portnow’s claim that women need to “step up.”
TIme’s Up campaign member Tina Tchen reveals the campaign had raised $20 million for its legal defense fund and received 1,000 requests for help during a Time’s Up panel at the 2018 Makers Conference. As of Feb. 16, the fund had topped 21 million. “Our overall goal is $100 million so while we have made great progress, we still have a ways to go,” says the Time’s Up spokesperson. “We encourage everyone to support the fund.”

Feb. 6
Women in Film launches a group to help victims of sexual harassment.

Feb. 18
Attendees wear black and Time’s Up pins to the BAFTA Film Awards at Royal Albert Hall in London, hosted by a solo woman, Joanna Lumley, for the first time in over two decades.

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