Glamour to Cease Publishing Regular Print Mag in Condé Nast’s Latest Digital Shift

After nearly 80 years, the monthly print edition of Condé Nast’s Glamour women’s magazine is ending.

Glamour’s last regularly published print edition, the January 2019 issue, is scheduled to hit newsstands next week, the company announced Tuesday.

It’s another move by Condé Nast away from declining print businesses to pivot to a mostly digital future, a trend that has cut across the entire publishing biz. Glamour has a print circulation of about 2 million, but the brand reaches an audience of around 20 million online, according to the company.

“We’re doubling down on digital — investing in the storytelling, service, and fantastic photo shoots we’ve always been known for, bringing it to the platforms our readers frequent most,” Samantha Barry, who joined Glamour in January as editor-in-chief, wrote in a memo to the magazine’s staff. “We’ll be expanding video and social storytelling, with new and ambitious series and projects.”

A Condé Nast spokesman said there are no layoffs planned with the end of the monthly print magazine.

Last year Condé Nast ended the print editions of Teen Vogue and Self. In addition, the company is seeking to sell three other magazines: Brides, Golf Digest and W.

Glamour will continue to publish special print issues, according to Barry. “We’re going to use print the way our audiences do — to celebrate big moments, like Women of the Year, with special issues that are ambitious, lush, and have longevity,” she wrote in the memo. Prior to joining Glamour, Barry was executive producer for social and emerging media at CNN Worldwide.

The shutdown of Glamour’s regular print run was first reported by the New York Times. The magazine launched in 1939 as “Glamour of Hollywood.”

At this point, Condé Nast plans to continue regularly publishing print editions of its other magazine titles, including Vogue, Vanity Fair, Wired, GQ, the New Yorker, Allure, Condé Nast Traveler, Architectural Digest and Bon Appétit.

Some Condé Nast publications have looked to bulk up their print businesses by bundling them with digital access. Wired and the New Yorker, for example, have paywalls restricting the amount of free web content users can view while providing unlimited access to subscribers.

Another component of the company’s digital strategy is Condé Nast Entertainment, which produces and distributes original content online as well as longer-form TV and film projects. On Monday, the company named Oren Katzeff, previously head of programming at Tastemade, as president of CNE.

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