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The Walt Disney Co. U.K. revealed Friday that it paid its male employees 22% more on average last year than its female staff, with the gap rising to 41.9% when it came to bonuses.

NBCUniversal Intl. also filed its legally mandated gender pay figures Friday – a public holiday in Britain – revealing that men at its U.K. operation earned 3.2% more than women in 2017. But NBCU is the first major film and TV company to report a bonus gap in favor of women, with its female staff getting 5.5% more on average.

Disney employs almost 3,000 people at The Walt Disney Co. and in its Disney stores across Britain. At its stores, male staff members were paid 19.8% more on average, and received a whopping 77.2% more than women in bonus payments.

In its filing, Disney contended that looking at equal pay for comparable jobs was a better measure of fairness than average pay. The company said it takes a “holistic approach to addressing and ensuring gender equality in our workforce” and the “statistics included in the gender pay gap measurement are not reflective of that holistic approach as they only measure the difference between average pay for men and women across a workforce as a whole.”

Disney added it has already made progress toward greater equality since the numbers put out Friday were gathered.

NBCU’s numbers come in well below the national average pay gap of 25% in Britain’s private sector. They are also significantly lower than the figures reported so far by most of the U.K.’s film and TV companies.

“At NBCUniversal, we champion an inclusive culture and strive to attract and develop a diverse, talented workforce to create and deliver a spectrum of content reflecting the current and changing face of the world,” NBCU said in its report.

Production and distribution group All3Media, which is owned by Discovery and Liberty, has also reported its pay data even though the company falls below the 250-employee threshold at which filing such figures is mandatory. Its gap was 13.5% in favor of men. Channel operator UKTV, which is backed by Discovery and BBC Worldwide, has reported a 17.9% pay gap and 52% bonus gap.

Viacom’s Channel 5 is an outlier, paying its female workers more than men, while production and distribution giant Endemol Shine said it paid men and women equally. The BBC, Channel 4 and STV all paid men more than women in 2017.