×

‘Darkest Hour’ Makeup Artist Left Retirement to Turn Gary Oldman Into Winston Churchill

The Oscar buzz surrounding Gary Oldman’s turn as Winston Churchill has been deafening since “Darkest Hour” hit the festival circuit last August, and he’s already racked up the lion’s share of this season’s accolades.

But when Oldman first met with producers and director Joe Wright for the Focus Features movie, he was open about his concerns. “I said to them, ‘We’re not talking about the elephant in the room, which is that I don’t look anything like Churchill,’” Oldman recalls. “I don’t know how this is going to be done, but if there’s one man who has even a remote chance of pulling this off, that’s Kazuhiro Tsuji.”

Makeup artist Tsuji had established himself as something of a miracle worker, having transformed Jim Carrey into the Grinch and helped Joseph Gordon-Levitt resemble a young Bruce Willis in “Looper.” There was only one problem: Tsuji had been retired from the business for several years, choosing to focus on his work as a sculptor — primarily oversize, realistic renditions of famous faces such as Abraham Lincoln, artist Frida Kahlo and his mentor, makeup legend Dick Smith.

Oldman and Tsuji had never made a film together, but they came close: They met when Tsuji did a face cast of the actor for Tim Burton’s 2001 “Planet of the Apes”; the role was ultimately played by Tim Roth. Still, Oldman remained a fan of Tsuji’s work as both a makeup artist and a sculptor, and sent the artist a plea via email. “He told me he would do this film if I said yes,” says Tsuji, adding with a laugh, “It wasn’t threatening; it was very nice.”

Nevertheless, Tsuji was hesitant. He had not enjoyed his time in the film business; he notes that after “The Grinch,” he had gone into therapy. “I had made a promise to myself to leave the business, and I felt like I would be going back on that promise,” he admits. “At the same time, I’d never really had the opportunity to work on a great movie with a great actor in a serious story.” Ultimately, he says, “It was kind of a dream project, so I had to do it.”

Asked if he was ever worried he might not be able to turn Oldman into Churchill, Tsuji doesn’t hesitate. “Yes, of course,” he allows. Six months of makeuptesting ensued. “Likeness makeup is almost impossible to pull off because everybody looks different,” Tsuji explains. “If the two people have proportions that are close, it’s easier. But these two are totally different. So I had to figure out the best balance to make him look like Churchill, but not [like he’s] wearing a mask.”

Meticulous detail was paid to the complexion, with Tsuji painting every mark and blotch by hand. The wig was made from hair not just from adults but from babies, to ensure the thin, wispy look. Oldman would ultimately spend four hours daily in the makeup chair, where David Malinowski and Lucy Sibbick oversaw the application. Removing the prosthetics took an hour at the end of the day.

The final product is so flawless, Oldman says, that he’s had to convince people it actually is makeup and he didn’t pack on pounds for the part. Tsuji has received his third Academy Award nomination, and Oldman cautions Tsuji that his retirement might not last long: “I’ve already spoken to some people who want to give you a call,” he says.

More Artisans

  • Crawl Movie

    'Crawl' and Other Disaster Movies Pose Unique Obstacles for Production Designers

    The rampaging fires, earthquakes and storms of disaster movies present unusual challenges for a production: On top of the normal work of creating a film’s lived-in and realistic locations, designers must build sets that the forces of nature can batter, flood and ravage into something completely different. Take “Crawl,” in which a Category 5 hurricane [...]

  • Costume designer Michele Clapton

    Costume Designers Fashion a Plan to Fight for Pay Parity in Upcoming Contract Talks

    The Costume Designers Guild Local 892 is gearing up to fight for pay equity in its 2021 contract negotiations with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers, establishing a pay-equity committee to raise awareness of the scale disparity between the mostly female CDG membership and the mostly male membership of the Art Directors Guild Local [...]

  • This photo shows composer Hans Zimmer

    Hans Zimmer on Recreating Iconic Score: 'The Lion King' 'Brought People Together'

    Composer Hans Zimmer is seated at the mixing board at the Sony scoring stage, head bobbing to the music being performed by 107 musicians just a few yards away. He’s wearing a vintage “Lion King World Tour” T-shirt, frayed at the collar. On the giant screen behind the orchestra, two lions are bounding across the [...]

  • On-Location Filming Slides 3.9% in Los

    On-Location Filming Slides 3.9% in Los Angeles in Second Quarter

    Held down by a lack of soundstage space, total on-location filming in greater Los Angeles declined 3.9% in the second quarter to 8,632 shoot days, permitting agency FilmLA reported Thursday. “Although our latest report reveals a decline in filming on location, local production facilities tell us that they are operating at capacity,” said FilmLA president [...]

  • Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

    How 'Once Upon a Time ... in Hollywood' Turned the Clock Back for Its Shoot

    Crossing the street took months for the crew that turned back the clock 50 years on Hollywood Boulevard for Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood.” Production designer Barbara Ling created false fronts for buildings that were constructed off-site and installed by crane just ahead of the shoot. Set decorator Nancy Haigh described [...]

  • Just Roll With It Disney Channel

    Disney Channel's Scripted-Improv Comedy Crew Shares How They 'Just Roll With It'

    The title of the new Disney Channel series “Just Roll With It” appears to be as much a directive for its cast and crew as it is a description of the multi-camera hybrid sitcom, which is part scripted and part improv. The plot revolves around the blended Bennett-Blatt family — strict mom Rachel (Suzi Barrett), [...]

  • "SpongeBob's Big Birthday Blowout" cast

    'SpongeBob' Voice Cast on Acting Together in Live-Action for 20th Anniversary Special

    On a brisk morning in February, the members of the voice cast of Nickelodeon’s flagship animated series “SpongeBob SquarePants” gathered to work on a new episode, like they’ve done most weeks over the past 20 years. But instead of being in a recording booth, this time they’ve assembled at a diner in Castaic, Calif., shooting [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content