×

How Phil Matarese and Mike Luciano Bring HBO’s ‘Animals’ to Life

Phil Matarese and Mike Luciano are not only the creators of HBO’s adult cartoon series “Animals”; they’re also the show’s animators, directors, writers and bringers of coffee.

Are they control freaks? “We have production coordinators and all that,” says Matarese, “but when it comes to the nitty-gritty of quality control, I oversee every single step of it, and we’re very much ingrained in every aspect of the show.”

One of the draws for fans is the show’s star talent, who, along with Matarese and Luciano, provide the voices for the various animals. Names include Aziz Ansari, Molly Shannon, Mindy Kaling, RuPaul, Jonah Hill, Usher, Demi Moore, Lucy Liu and Michael Sheen. Humans also populate this anthropomorphic world.

“Animals” started as a YouTube short inspired by the pigeons cavorting outside the office windows of Matarese and Luciano, who worked at a New York ad agency at the time. They presented the show’s first two episodes at Sundance in 2015. Four months later, HBO picked up the series with a two-season order, and in May 2017 it renewed it for Season 3. The 10-episode season began Aug. 3.

Through HBO, Mark and Jay Duplass’ Duplass Brothers Prods. — the company behind HBO’s live-action series “Togetherness” and such films as “Safety Not Guaranteed” — also got on board.

Matarese drew the original “Animals” on a $50 Wacom tablet, embellished via Adobe Illustrator and transferred to his Apple laptop’s Final Cut Pro editing program for finishing. But it became clear that he and Luciano needed a quicker turnaround for the eight episodes in Season 1, so they incorporated Toon Boom Harmony into their workflow — software used by several major animation studios. “We still drew in both Illustrator and Photoshop,” says Matarese, “though [Season 3] has been almost all in Photoshop. I’ve found out how to get those really nice thick lines that I loved Illustrator for in Photoshop, and now we’ve got our own custom pens.”

Matarese adds that the characters are quite detailed. “That’s the style for the show,” he says. “It’s clunky to animate, and it’s kind of a nightmare for everybody, but we like our characters to have lots of [rough] lines.”

For Season 1, the pair worked out of an office in Burbank; in Season 2, they partnered with Canadian company Big Jump Entertainment to help ease some of their animation duties. They record at Starburns Industries in Burbank, which Luciano likes for its large recording booths.

“We can fit more people in there,” he says. “We always wanted that type of environment, and for the actors — all of them — to be inside the booth. We wanted that organic feel where people are stepping over their lines a little bit and they can improvise off each other and create that kind of energy around the scene. It makes editing the show tricky, but we want the dialogue to have that realistic feel.”

More Artisans

  • How 'Inception' VFX Supervisor May Leung

    Why 'Inception' Visual Effects Supervisor May Leung Is a Rare Gem

    For some unfortunate reasons, May Leung is an anomaly in the world of visual effects supervision. While there are plenty of women in the world of VFX at large, Leung is part of the only 5% of them who make it to the top role of supervisor. Her work has been featured in 38 films, including [...]

  • The Pennybox LTC Sandra Pennington

    How DIY Gear Is Helping Camera Crews Get the Job Done and Changing the Industry

    Cinematographers and their camera crews often tweak equipment to fit their needs. Sometimes it results in Garrett Brown inventing, designing and building the Oscar-winning Steadicam, or Nic Sadler developing the Artemis Director’s Viewfinder, which earned him an Engineering Emmy. But DPs and camera assistants regularly create tools and accessories to help them and their colleagues become [...]

  • Charm City Kings Movie

    How 'Charm City Kings' Cinematographer Throttled Up the Realism

    Puerto Rican director Ángel Manuel Soto stuck with his decision to bring on cinematographer Katelin Arizmendi for Sony’s “Charm City Kings” despite the studio’s desire for someone with more experience. Though Arizmendi’s credits included just a pair of indie features, Soto knew that her use of naturalistic light with touches of heightened realism were ideal [...]

  • Crip Camp

    How 'Crip Camp' Allowed Co-Director Jim LeBrecht Tell His Story of Representation

    The new Netflix documentary “Crip Camp” centers on Camp Jened, a summer camp for those with disabilities. As told in the doc, it would go on to spark something of a revolution in the disability rights movement. Filmmakers Nicole Newnham and Jim LeBrecht (who had worked with Newnham as a sound designer on her projects) [...]

  • Self Made Netflix

    How Netflix's 'Self Made' Tells First Female Millionaire's Tale With Eclectic Soundtrack

    Netflix’s “Self Made: Inspired by the Life of Madam C.J. Walker,” the story of America’s first self-made female millionaire, takes place between 1908 and 1918. But the music, instead of focusing on the early jazz that might be expected, runs the gamut from ragtime to hip-hop. “Madam C.J. Walker is a central, seminal historical figure [...]

  • Mark Lanza

    Motion Picture of Sound Editors President on the Impact of Coronavirus on the Industry

    Mark Lanza, president of the Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE), has been working from home. This is the new norm for him (and thousands of others) as a supervising sound editor. Before the coronavirus pandemic shut down production, Lanza, whose credits include “Manhunt” and “On Becoming a God in Central Florida,” was used to mixing [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content