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Dozens of TV Shows Canceled Across Networks Ahead of Upfronts

It’s that time of year again. As the major networks prepare for annual upfront presentations in New York next week, they’re sharpening their axes, canceling shows left and right to make room for new titles in the fall. The house-cleaning includes both freshmen series like Fox’s trio of newcomers — “Son of Zorn,” “Making History,” and “APB” — bubble shows like “Sleepy Hollow,” and veterans like Tim Allen’s “Last Man Standing” on ABC.

Fox

“Scream Queens”: Ryan Murphy’s horror comedy struggled to find an audience, despite its strong social media buzz.

Sleepy Hollow”: After developing a loyal fanbase, “Sleepy Hollow,” starring Tom Mison as Ichabod Crane, was canceled after four seasons. The supernatural drama saw its ratings drop sharply in Season 4, averaging a 0.5 rating in the 18-49 demo and 1.9 million total viewers — down 40% in the demo and and 37% in viewers from the previous season.

“Rosewood”: The police procedural drama, centered around a Miami pathologist played by Morris Chestnut, was axed after two seasons. The show originally aired on Wednesdays as the lead-in to “Empire.” The ratings quickly plummeted when it moved to Thursdays and then Fridays this season. It closed out Season 2 down more than 50% in the key demo and nearly 40% in total viewers compared to its first season.

Pitch”: The baseball drama about the fictional first female MLB player failed to find an audience and struck out after a single season. Despite early buzz, the show averaged a 0.8 live-plus-same-day Nielsen rating in the 18-49 demo and 3 million total viewers per episode. The cancellation, however, offers good news for “Riverdale” — Mark Consuelos will be able to resume his role as Veronica Lodge’s father Hiram.

“Son of Zorn”: The live-action/CGI hybrid starring Jason Sudeikis debuted to solid ratings back in September, with a 2.4 rating in adults 18-49 and 6.1 million viewers. However, it shed over 50% of that audience the following week, with subsequent episodes slipping even further.

“Making History”: The Adam Pally-starrer failed to make much of an impact from the onset, opening to an anemic 0.9 rating in adults 18-49 and 2.2 million viewers. Things quickly went downhill from there, with the comedy averaging a 0.7 and 1.6 million viewers over 9 episodes.

“APB”: By the time freshman drama “APB” wrapped Season 1, the series averaged only a 0.8 rating in adults 18-49 and 3.4 million viewers.

ABC

Last Man Standing”: Tim Allen’s follow-up to “Home Improvement” was sent packing after six seasons as ratings waned in the last season.

“Time After Time”: The period drama starring Freddie Stroma as H.G. Wells was pulled from ABC’s schedule late March, effectively canceling the freshman drama after only five episodes.

“Conviction”: The series starring Hayley Atwell as a former First Daughter blackmailed into heading a New York unit dedicated to examining suspected wrongful convictions wasn’t re-elected after its first season.

“American Crime”: John Ridley’s prestige drama starring Felicity Huffman and Regina King had three critically acclaimed seasons, but the response from viewers didn’t hold sway. The Season 3 finale drew a mere 0.4 in the adults 18-49 demo.

“Secrets and Lies”: Based on the Australian television series of the same name, the second season of “Secrets and Lies” was held back last midseason, launching this past fall instead — a year and a half after the end of the first season. The series was pulled after ratings plummeted significantly.

“Imaginary Mary”: After just one season on the air, Jenna Elfman’s sitcom was canceled after its ratings couldn’t compete with other ABC comedy series.

“Dr. Ken”: ABC pulled the plug on “Dr. Ken,” the sitcom from “The Hangover” and “Community” actor Ken Jeong, after two seasons. Jeong also served as creator, writer, and executive producer/director. The show’s ratings dropped in its sophomore season, averaging 5.1 million viewers per episode, with a 1.1 in the 18-to-49 demo.

“The Real O’Neals”: Another sophomore comedy, “The Real O’Neals” got the ax after delivering disappointing ratings in its second year.

“The Catch”: Like “Dr. Ken,” ABC dropped the Peter Krause and Mireille Enos-starrer after two seasons. The Shondaland caper averaged 4.6 million viewers this season.

NBC

“Chicago Justice”: Dick Wolf’s law-inspired spinoff for the city of Chicago was canceled after a single season, which averaged a 1.1 rating and 6.1 million viewers per episode. It was the lowest rated of all four “Chicago” series.

“Emerald City”: The Oz-based show starring Adria Arjona as Dorothy Gale reached the end of the yellow brick road after one season. Its ratings slowly plummeted with each additional episode.

“Powerless”: The DC-universe set show exploring the lives of citizens attempting to protect themselves from superhero-induced catastrophes had its last three episodes pulled after consistently low ratings.

“The Blacklist: Redemption”: The crime thriller spinoff of “The Blacklist,” starring Famke Janssen, was canceled after just one season. The show drew middling ratings, averaging a 0.8 in the 18-49 demo, according to Nielsen live-plus-same-day numbers.

MTV

“Sweet/Vicious”: Starring Eliza Bennett and Taylor Dearden, “Sweet/Vicious” followed two teenagers set on becoming vigilantes at their high school, particularly against perpetrators of sexual assault. The show, however, received lackluster ratings and was canceled after one season.

The CW

“Frequency”: Pulled after just one season, “Frequency” featured Peyton List as Raimy Sullivan, and NYPD detective who realizes she can communicate with her deceased father using a ham radio. It averaged a 0.26 rating in adults 18-49 and 936,000 viewers per episode

“No Tomorrow”: Based on a Brazilian TV series about a woman compiling an “apocalist” — a bucket list to complete before the end of the world — “No Tomorrow” — another CW freshman series — won’t see another day.  The show drew a 0.26 and 794,000 viewers.

WGN America

“Outsiders”: Marking WGN America’s third attempt as original programming, “Outsiders” was canceled after two season, just one season less than the network’s longest-running original program.

CBS

“The Odd Couple”: The Matthew Perry and Thomas Lennon multi-camera comedy averaged a 1.0 rating in the 18-49 demo and 5 million total viewers. CBS decided not to extend its 13-episode order for Season 3 back in November, but the cancellation is now official.

“Criminal Minds: Beyond Borders”: The “Criminal Minds” spinoff, starring Gary Sinise, never saw the ratings its parent show enjoyed. Season 2 is currently averaging a 0.8 rating in adults 18-49 and 5 million viewers per episode, down significantly in both measures from Season 1.

“The Great Indoors”: The Joel McHale and Christopher Mintz-Plasse sitcom averaged a 1.4 rating and 6.9 million viewers per episode, but was still pulled, despite being one of the network’s highest-rated comedies.

“2 Broke Girls”: The comedy, starring Kat Dennings and Beth Behrs as waitresses, has been canceled after six seasons at CBS. The series posted solid ratings throughout its run. Season 6 averaged a 1.3 rating in adults 18-49 and 5.6 million viewers per episode, airing mostly on Monday nights.

“Doubt”: In possibly the most ruthless cancellation of the season, “Doubt,” a courtroom drama starring Katherine Heigl and Dule Hill was booted after only two episodes aired. The second episode of the drama shed almost half of the total viewership of its lead-in, “Criminal Minds.”

“Pure Genius”: The medical drama starring Dermot Mulroney was forced to end its run after one season. The series averaged only a 0.9 Nielsen live-plus-same-day rating among adults 18-49 over four episodes.

USA Network

“Eyewitness”: Based on a Norwegian television series, the show centered around the relationship between two boys after they witness a triple homicide. Despite the presence of “Law & Order: Criminal Intent” veteran Julianne Nicholson, the series couldn’t find an audience over its first 10 episodes.

The Disney Channel

“Girl Meets World”: The spinoff of the hit Disney channel show “Boy Meets World” got the hammer after three seasons.

Syfy

“Incorporated”: The Ben Affleck and Matt Damon-backed dystopian drama, which depicted a world controlled be multinational corporations, was axed after one season. It averaged a live-plus-same-day audience of just under 500,000 and a 0.16 in the 18-49 demographic.

Cinemax

“The Knick”: Cinemax pulled the plug on the acclaimed Steven Soderbergh drama after two seasons.

FXX

“Man Seeking Woman”: The comedy starring Jay Baruchel and Eric Andre, and created by Simon Rich ended its search after three seasons, by the end unable to retain even half of lead-in “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia’s” audience.

Freeform

“Baby Daddy”: The Freeform series will end at the conclusion of its sixth season. The May 22 finale will now serve as a series finale.

Canceled TV Shows in 2017 — What’s Not Returning
Canceled TV Shows in 2017 — What’s Not Returning

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