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Gloria Steinem Gets a Standing Ovation at Michael Moore’s Broadway Opening

Gloria Steinem got a mid-show standing ovation at the Broadway opening night of Michael Moore’s “The Terms of My Surrender,” after the feminist icon made a rousing surprise appearance in Moore’s Broadway debut.

Steinem, the latest in a list of special guests that have included Bryan Cranston and Maxine Waters, discussed the renewed push to pass the Equal Rights Amendment and predicted the end of the electoral college. She also struck a note of optimism in a show that’s largely activated by outrage over the rise of Trump.

“I’m a hope-aholic,” Steinem said in conversation with Moore on stage at the Belasco Theater Aug. 10. “Though it’s incredibly dangerous what happened, it awakened — We are woke now. We are seriously woke.”

The talk with Steinem was part of a show that touched on both the personal and political, from Moore’s diagnosis of the current state of the Democrats to a story about his teenage campaign for a spot on the school board. He also talked about the day’s news — although perhaps not quite as much as might be expected by audiences anticipating a ripped-from-the-headlines standup routine.

He’d rather leave hot-takes on the day’s news to late-night comedians, Moore told Variety at the show’s opening night party at Bryant Park Grill. “We all think that Trump is easily distracted by shiny keys, but the truth is: He’s the one holding the shiny keys, and we’re the ones distracted,” he said. “He threatens North Korea with fire and fury — He doesn’t mean that! He’s been too lazy to appoint an ambassador to South Korea! It’s a distraction so we don’t cover what we should really be covering about him.”

The traditional Broadway demographic tends to share the same left-leaning beliefs that Moore does, but he doesn’t believe that preaching to the choir is necessarily a bad thing — not when the choir is so demoralized.

“This choir needs a song to sing,” he said. “This choir’s been depressed since November.”

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