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Film Review: ‘Mon Mon Mon Monsters’

Teenage bullying and supernatural horror neatly combine in this juicy outing from talented Taiwanese filmmaker Giddens Ko.

Director:
Giddens Ko
With:
Deng Yu-kai, Kent Tsai, Carolyn Chen, Liang Ru-xuan, Eugenie Liu, Lin Pei-hsin, Tao Bo-meng, Lai Jun-cheng, Yuri Kao. (Mandarin dialogue)

Official Site: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt6648404/

All the monsters are in plain sight in “Mon Mon Mon Monsters,” a savagely funny social horror movie about high school teens who capture a flesh-eating ghoul and torture it for their own amusement — and then some. The highly imaginative brainchild of popular Taiwanese author and filmmaker Giddens Ko, “Monsters” paints a disturbing picture of contemporary youth culture while delivering gruesome sights that’ll have horror hounds howling in approval. Though slim in analyzing of what has driven these kids to such extremes, Ko’s vividly decorated and atmospherically filmed exercise in nihilistic horror is a mighty fine ride for those who like this sort of thing. Opening in Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore on July 28, the film already has several international fest dates planned, which bodes well for commercial prospects outside the region.

Admirers of Ko’s 2011 debut, a delightful romantic comedy called “You Are the Apple of My Eye,” may see “Monsters” as a radically different departure. And yet, considering Ko’s prolific output as a writer of frequently strange stories, not to mention his no-holds-barred screenplay (based on his novel) for last year’s supremely kinky social horror “The Tenants Downstairs,” it shouldn’t be such a surprise to find him delving into the dark terrain here.

Rather than withholding its title monsters, the movie offers a quick and graphic look at the beasties straight away, as two female “things” tear apart and eat a vagrant in subterranean Taipei City. And yet, as light approaches, they scuttle into cardboard boxes for safety, revealing these creatures to be vulnerable as well as vicious.

Whereas they monsters have someplace to hide, no such safe haven exists for Lin Shu-wei (Deng Yu-kai), a senior high school student whom we meet mid-humiliation session: Teacher Ms. Li (Carolyn Chen) accuses Lin of stealing school funds, while students yell insults and pelt him with various objects. Outside the classroom, Lin is bullied relentlessly by everyone, especially Ren-hao (Kent Tsai), a borderline psychopath and his worst tormentor. Lin nevertheless submits to him and becomes the resident whipping boy in Ren-hao’s gang.

While serving a community service order in a run-down apartment block, the gang encounters the creatures, eventually capturing one and chaining it up in a deserted building. Visibly affected by Ren-hao’s appalling torture of his young captive (Lin Pei-hsin), Lin attempts to make friends with her, even promising to enable her escape. The big question here is whether Lin is sincere or simply enjoying being the victimizer for a change. While the issue of Lin’s allegiance supplies compelling emotional stakes, Ko’s screenplay cleverly pulls viewers in one direction and then the other before the high-impact moment of truth arrives.

In the meantime, Ren-hao and his unnamed girlfriend (Liang Ru-xuan, excellent as a fun-lovin’ gal with an extremely cold heart) extract blood and teeth from the creature and use them to gruesome effect on enemies. In a scene that sadly doesn’t seem over-the-top, students are more concerned with taking pictures and saying “wow” when the unfortunate Ms. Li goes up in a ball of flames.

It’s only a matter of time before the second, older creature (Eugenie Liu) comes to find her sister and take revenge on the captors. The results are impressive, with a bloodbath on the school bus being the standout set-piece.

A fine young cast delivers rock-solid performances, with special kudos due to Lin as the young creature. Working without dialogue via just her eyes and face, the actress succeeds in evoking great sympathy for the trapped being, even though she’s a deadly ghoul. Oyster Liao’s production design and Chou Yi-hsien’s atmospheric photography give the film a grimy, sullied look that’s perfectly in tune with Lin’s view of the world. For the record, the Mandarin title translates as “Report to the teacher! Strange strange monster.”

Film Review: ‘Mon Mon Mon Monsters’

Reviewed at BiFan Film Festival, July 17, 2017. (Also in Hong Kong, Neuchatel, Udine Far Eat, Fantasia, New York Asian film festivals.) Running time: 112 MIN. (Original title: “Baogao, laoshi! guai, guai, guai, guaiwu”)

Production: (Taiwan) A Vie Vision (in Taiwan), Edko Films (in Hong Kong), Clover Pictures (in Singapore) release of a Star Ritz Intl. Entertainment production. (International sales: Star Ritz, Taipei City.) Producers: Angie Chan, Giddens Ko. Executive producer: Molly Fang.

Crew: Director, writer: Giddens Ko. Camera (color, widescreen, HD): Chou Yi-hsien. Editor: Li Nien-hsui.

With: Deng Yu-kai, Kent Tsai, Carolyn Chen, Liang Ru-xuan, Eugenie Liu, Lin Pei-hsin, Tao Bo-meng, Lai Jun-cheng, Yuri Kao. (Mandarin dialogue)

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