×
You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Santa Barbara Film Festival Announces 2017 Award Winners

The Santa Barbara International Film Festival announced the winners of the 32nd fest on Saturday.

Eleven awards were doled out at the annual breakfast, all leading up to the audience prize, which went to “My Hero Brother.” Director Yonatan Nir’s touching movie follows a group of young people with Down syndrome who embark with their siblings on a trip through the Himalayas. The film also received the best documentary award.

Three awards were handed out for short films. Cameron Fay’s “It’s Been Like a Year” nabbed the Bruce Corwin Award for live action short film, while “Confino,” directed by Nico Bonomolo, received the same prize for animated short film. Documentary short film went to two films with nearly identical titles: “Refugee,” a portrait of a West African woman who leaves her children to come to the U.S. in pursuit of the American Dream, directed by Joyce Chen and Emily Moore; and “Refuge,” directed by Matthew K. Firpo, about the European refugee crisis .

The nueva vision award for Spanish/Latin American cinema was given to Elia Schneider’s “Tamara,” chosen by jury members for its bold stance on transitioning genders.

Paul Shoulberg’s “The Good Catholic” won the Panavision spirit award for independent cinema. “Every once in a while you get the privilege to watch a film that pulls you in emotionally from the opening moment, ‘The Good Catholic’ is that movie,” jury members Joanna Kerns and Richard Harris said of the film.

The social justice award for documentary film went to “Angry Inuk,” directed by Alethea Arnaquq-Baril. Jury members said they chose the film for its deep dive into the central role of seal hunting on the lives of the Inuit. “The Constitution” received the Jeffrey C. Barbakow Award for international film. It’s an ambitious look at neighbors in a building who avoid each other because of their differences in assets, sexual habits, nationality, and religion.

The ADL Stand Up Award went to Wiktor Ericsson’s “Strawberry Days” — an exploration of the exploitation of foreign workers. The award recognizes the impact that storytelling can have in fostering mutual understanding.

The Valhalla Award for best Nordic film was handed out to “Sami Blood,” directed by Amanda Kernell.

More Film

  • Lucas (Jonah Hauer-King) and Bella (Amber)

    China's Bona Film Boards Brad Pitt's 'Ad Astra,' 'A Dog's Way Home' (EXCLUSIVE)

    China’s Bona Film Group is co-financing Brad Pitt space adventure “Ad Astra,” one of several films in a strong slate of international movies the company plans to release in the Middle Kingdom over the next year. Bona has also acquired Roland Emmerich’s war spectacular “Midway” and is investing in “A Dog’s Way Home,” the sequel [...]

  • Aquaman 2018

    Film News Roundup: 'Aquaman' Sets Pre-Sales Record

    In today’s film news roundup, “Aquaman” sets a pre-sales record, “Bohemian Rhapsody” hits a milestone, and SAG-AFTRA promotes four executives.  PRE-SALES RECORD “Aquaman” has set a pre-sales record for Atom Tickets, topping “Deadpool 2,” “Avengers: Infinity War,” and “Black Panther.” “Clearly, ‘Aquaman’ has captured the attention of movie fans with its larger-than-life adventure that must [...]

  • 'Liga' Kicks Off At Ventana Sur's

    Ventana Sur: 'La Liga' Kicks Off at Buenos Aires' Animation!

    Spain’s Quirino Awards, Argentina’s Animation! and Mexico’s Pixelatl Festival, three key events in Ibero-American animation, will join forces to create La Liga (The League), as announced Wednesday at an Animation! round table hosted by the Quirino Awards, titled “Iberoamerican Alliance Models.” Speakers included Quirino Awards promoter José Luis Farias, Mexico’s Pixelatl director José Iñesta, Gonzalo [...]

  • The Quake Review

    Film Review: 'The Quake'

    Roar Uthaug’s 2015 “The Wave” revived the pleasures of the 1970s disaster-movie cycle in a form that seemed purer than the never-quite-dead genre’s recent Stateside incarnations — most of which seem to involve Dwayne Johnson in a generic pileup of CGI perils. “The Wave” wasn’t high art, but it was entertainment that delivered some standard [...]

  • The Mule trailer

    Film Review: Clint Eastwood in 'The Mule'

    From Dirty Harry to … dirty grandpa, Clint Eastwood certainly has a type of character that he plays best, and “The Mule” finds him squarely in his comfort zone, appearing as a surly old horticulturalist who, at age 90, has become perhaps the most reliable drug runner for the Sinaloa cartel, evading detection for nearly [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content