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Powers Boothe, ‘Deadwood,’ ‘Sin City’ Actor, Dies at 68

Powers Boothe, a prolific character actor on the small and big screen, died Sunday in Los Angeles. He was 68.

According to his rep, Boothe died in his sleep Sunday morning of natural causes.

The veteran actor was best known for playing snarling villains like Curly Bill Brocious in the 1993 Western “Tombstone” and saloon owner Cy Tolliver in HBO’s “Deadwood.”

He also appeared in several comic book shows and movies, portraying Senator Roark in “Sin City” and its sequel “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For” (pictured above). He also had a small role in “The Avengers” and “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.”

His talents weren’t only limited to genre material. Boothe played former mayor Lamar Wyatt on 26 episodes of the country drama “Nashville,” as well as Judge “Wall” Hatfield on “Hatfields & McCoys.” Prior to that, he played Vice President Daniels on “24.”Actor Beau Bridges tweeted news of Boothe’s passing on Sunday.

“It’s with great sadness that I mourn the passing of my friend Powers Boothe. A dear friend, great actor, devoted father & husband.”

In 1980, Boothe took home the Emmy for lead actor in a limited series or special for playing infamous cult leader Jim Jones in “Guyana Tragedy: The Story of Jim Jones.”

His other notable film roles included “Southern Comfort,” “Red Dawn,” “The Emerald Forest,” and Oliver Stone’s “Nixon,” in which he played Alexander Haig.

Born in Snyder, Texas, Boothe joined the Oregon Shakespeare Festival after graduating from college and worked in theater before moving to film and television.

According to reps, there will be a private service held in Texas where he was from. A memorial celebration in his honor is being considered for a future date. Donations can be made to the Gary Sinise Foundation, which honors the nation’s defenders, veterans, first responders, their families and those in need.

He is survived by his wife and two children.

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