×

David Lynch on ‘Twin Peaks,’ ‘Arthouse’ Television, ‘Lynchian Fear’

David Lynch broke up his audience at the Camerimage film festival screening of the first two episodes of his “Twin Peaks” reboot Tuesday, offering coy responses to questions about his methods, inspirations and plans.

As for how he managed to revive the cult hit series from the early 90s and find elements that would work for new viewers 25 years later, he said, “There was a dream that took place in ‘Twin Peaks’ – Agent Cooper’s dream that took place 25 years into the future.” The actor-artist-musician-director said the vision, which his central character had in the surreal Red Room setting of the series, was fortuitous “as if it was fate all along.” During the original broadcast of “Twin Peaks” no one had any idea the series might actually return in that time frame when the spirit of murdered girl Laura Palmer said to Cooper, “I’ll see you in 25 years.”

In working with actors who had aged a quarter century, Lynch said, “some things are definitely different but some things remain the same.” The cast, who were “like family,” hung on to their essential qualities, he added. “They seemed a bit older but they were themselves. It was like no time had passed really.”

When asked what he meant when Lynch had once called the new “Twin Peaks” an 18-hour movie, he said, “I meant it was an 18-hour movie.” “Television and cinema to me are exactly the same thing,” Lynch explained. “Telling a story with motion, pictures and sound. It ended up being 18 hours,” he said, but each hour is just a part of the whole, which could also be taken in in one marathon sitting.

The director would not reveal details about prospects for the series’ fourth season, saying, for now, “There’s nothing to talk about.”

When asked whether he planned to make any further feature films, Lynch repeated an observation he’s made on his current European tour, calling TV “the new arthouse,” noting that the small screen has taken over this role from movie theaters, which are now dominated mainly by tentpoles and action fare.

Lynch also explained his choices of indie bands, which wrap each episode of the series reboot, performing extended tracks in the characters’ favorite hangout, the Bang Bang Bar roadhouse. Season 3 features the Chromatics, The Cactus Blossoms, Au Revoir Simone, Trouble and Sharon Van Etten in just the first six episodes. “In the roadhouse there’s a stage and different bands play,” Lynch said, “so it was a perfect opportunity to have different bands come into Twin Peaks and play the roadhouse.” The director chose the musicians from “many” bands’ submission tracks, he said.

When one fan asked how the director feels about the term “Lynchian fear,” which describes the phenomenon in which an ordinary object becomes terrifying, as often happens in his films and series, Lynch said, “I have the same answer all the time: My doctor told me not to think about these things.”

Asked about the origins of the shadowy, ash-covered figures that sometimes menace his characters in “Twin Peaks,” Lynch said simply that they date back to his 1992 film adaptation of the original series, “Twin Peaks — Fire Walk With Me.”

More Film

  • Thierry Fremaux Cannes

    Thierry Fremaux Says 'Cannes Will Always Side With Artists' at Alain Delon's Tribute

    Thierry Fremaux, the artistic director of the Cannes Film Festival, delivered a heartfelt homage to Alain Delon at a ceremony on Sunday during which the French actor received the honorary Palme d’Or. Alluding to the controversy that Delon has triggered with his past declarations, Fremaux said the actor was entitled to have his own convictions [...]

  • Joseph Gordon-Levitt's '7500' Sells to Amazon

    Joseph Gordon-Levitt's Thriller '7500' Sells to Amazon Studios

    Amazon Studios has acquired global rights to Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s terrorist drama “7500.” The deal, announced Monday at the Cannes Film Festival, excludes Germany, Switzerland, and Austria. Universum will distribute the film in Germany. In “7500,” Gordon-Levitt plays the co-pilot of a plane that has been hijacked by terrorists. The title references the code 7500, which [...]

  • Cannes: China's Rediance Boards Sales on

    Cannes: China's Rediance Picks Up Sales on 'Ways to Run' (EXCLUSIVE)

    Chinese indie sales and production finance outfit Rediance has boarded sales on “Ways to Run,” a project in the Cannes Film Festival’s Cinefondation La Residence section. The film picked up a special mention at the prize presentation. The road movie drama is being directed by Afghan-Dutch director Aboozar Amin, who previously made the documentary “Kabul: [...]

  • John Williams Pens Theme for Disneyland's

    John Williams in Disneyland: The Story Behind His 'Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge' Theme

    For only the second time in more than four decades of “Star Wars” music, legendary composer John Williams has written a new theme for a “Star Wars” project that is distinct from his film scores for those galaxies far, far away. Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge, the much-anticipated attraction that will open at Disneyland on May [...]

  • Young Ahmed

    Cannes Film Review: 'Young Ahmed'

    There’s a darkness to “Young Ahmed” that audiences have never seen before in the work of Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, the gifted Belgian brothers whose profoundly humane, unapologetically realist dramas have twice earned them the Palme d’Or in Cannes. Like surrogate parents to troubled children, the sibling directors have taken on their share of difficult [...]

  • Radegund

    Cannes: Fox Searchlight Nabs Terrence Malick's 'A Hidden Life'

    Fox Searchlight has picked up rights for U.S. and several international territories on Terrence Malick’s contemplative World War II drama “A Hidden Life,” following its enthusiastic reception at the Cannes Film Festival. “A Hidden Life” tells the true story of the Austrian farmer Franz Jägerstätter, who rejected Adolf Hitler and objected to the war. He [...]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content