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David Lynch on ‘Twin Peaks,’ ‘Arthouse’ Television, ‘Lynchian Fear’

David Lynch broke up his audience at the Camerimage film festival screening of the first two episodes of his “Twin Peaks” reboot Tuesday, offering coy responses to questions about his methods, inspirations and plans.

As for how he managed to revive the cult hit series from the early 90s and find elements that would work for new viewers 25 years later, he said, “There was a dream that took place in ‘Twin Peaks’ – Agent Cooper’s dream that took place 25 years into the future.” The actor-artist-musician-director said the vision, which his central character had in the surreal Red Room setting of the series, was fortuitous “as if it was fate all along.” During the original broadcast of “Twin Peaks” no one had any idea the series might actually return in that time frame when the spirit of murdered girl Laura Palmer said to Cooper, “I’ll see you in 25 years.”

In working with actors who had aged a quarter century, Lynch said, “some things are definitely different but some things remain the same.” The cast, who were “like family,” hung on to their essential qualities, he added. “They seemed a bit older but they were themselves. It was like no time had passed really.”

When asked what he meant when Lynch had once called the new “Twin Peaks” an 18-hour movie, he said, “I meant it was an 18-hour movie.” “Television and cinema to me are exactly the same thing,” Lynch explained. “Telling a story with motion, pictures and sound. It ended up being 18 hours,” he said, but each hour is just a part of the whole, which could also be taken in in one marathon sitting.

The director would not reveal details about prospects for the series’ fourth season, saying, for now, “There’s nothing to talk about.”

When asked whether he planned to make any further feature films, Lynch repeated an observation he’s made on his current European tour, calling TV “the new arthouse,” noting that the small screen has taken over this role from movie theaters, which are now dominated mainly by tentpoles and action fare.

Lynch also explained his choices of indie bands, which wrap each episode of the series reboot, performing extended tracks in the characters’ favorite hangout, the Bang Bang Bar roadhouse. Season 3 features the Chromatics, The Cactus Blossoms, Au Revoir Simone, Trouble and Sharon Van Etten in just the first six episodes. “In the roadhouse there’s a stage and different bands play,” Lynch said, “so it was a perfect opportunity to have different bands come into Twin Peaks and play the roadhouse.” The director chose the musicians from “many” bands’ submission tracks, he said.

When one fan asked how the director feels about the term “Lynchian fear,” which describes the phenomenon in which an ordinary object becomes terrifying, as often happens in his films and series, Lynch said, “I have the same answer all the time: My doctor told me not to think about these things.”

Asked about the origins of the shadowy, ash-covered figures that sometimes menace his characters in “Twin Peaks,” Lynch said simply that they date back to his 1992 film adaptation of the original series, “Twin Peaks — Fire Walk With Me.”

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