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‘Loving Vincent’ Breaks Out in Italy

Painted in Van Gogh’s vigorous style, the labor of love feature has notched up near $1.3 million off a three-dat event-programed run

Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman’s “Loving Vincent,” a Vincent van Gogh biopic using the painter’s hallmark impasto style, has broken out in Italy to a standout near $1.3 million on a three-day “event” run.

In its latest festival berth, “Loving Vincent” closes the 54th Antalya Intl. Film Festival on Oct. 27.

Bowing on Oct. 16, a Monday, as part of a Nexo Digital season of  Great Art to Cinemas movies, the world’s first fully oil painted feature film, which was distributed by Adler Entertainment, punched 120,000 admissions over its initial three-day run this week.

Figure is more than double the daily box office of “Blade Runner 2049,” Cinema Management Group, the film’s sales agent said in a statement. Nexo Digital called the box office “the most-watched film event ever in Italy.”

In further early openings, “Loving Vincent” was first released in the U.S. on Sept, 22, handled by Good Deed Entertainment, running up nearly $ 1million trawl on a roll-out strategy that will see it playing over 100 US/Canadian theaters this weekend. In Poland, where it is distributed by Next Film, the film will cross 150,000 admissions this weekend after 14 days in release. CMG said.

“Loving Vincent” will now open in 130 territories worldwide over the upcoming months, according to CMG, a market-count which is another sign of large interest in the movie, whose titanic labor of love looks unlikely to ever become a new production model.

World premiering at the Annecy Intl. Animation film Festival, “Loving Vincent” is directed by Dorota Kobiela, one of Variety’s 10 Animators to Watch in 2017, and Hugh Welchman. It stars Douglas Booth, Jerome Flynn, Chris O’Dowd, Oscar nominee Saoirse Ronan and Eleanor Tomlinson, and is produced by the U.K. and Poland-based Academy Award winners BreakThru Films (“Peter and the Wolf”) in co-production with David Parfitt’s Trademark Films (“Shakespeare in Love”).

A titanic enterprise, near seven years in the making, “Loving Vincent’s” saw its animators painting by hand the film’s near 65,000 frames, working off live-action shots of professional actors and enrolling as settings some of van Gogh’s most famous oeuvres, such as  “Café Terrace at Night.”

Plot is a murder mystery plumbing the circumstances surrounding Van Gogh’s most probably self-inflicted gunshot wounds which, when complications set in, caused this death.

At Annecy, “Loving Vincent” received a 10-minute-plus standing ovation which lasted throughout the final credit sequence and beyond, One of the French festival’s most talked-about movies, it went on to score Annecy’s Audience Award, for film distributors the most coveted festival plaudits.

The feature also scored very largely bullish reviews, Variety, in an extended review, calling “Loving Vincent” a “truly awe-inspiring portrait of the great Dutch artist,”  “pulling audiences into the delirious, hyper-sensual world suggested by van Gogh’s oeuvre.” The film “brings a poetic sense of tragedy to the last act of van Gogh’s life, and fresh insight into the kind of man he was,” the review added.

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